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4 messages
08/11/2012 at 17:27

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/15577.jpg?width=533&height=350&mode=max

This is where I come to walk our dogs (I also have ridden here),on the Quantock hills in somerset.We come here in every season and weather.There is so much to learn from nature how plants need to grow.I was told that there are up to sixty different types of heather that grow on the moors.Here the heather(ling) grows in abundance and looks stunning when its out as does the yellow gorse with its coconut scent.There are Holly trees,oak,Hawthorn growing here on top as well as in the wooded valleys.Ravens savenge here and Buzzards hover above its  a place for inspiration .It tells me how heather will grow and why it wont in my garden,and how with out any help looks wonderful,nature gets it right and yes I know man gives a little helping hand,but look about you when out and about for garden design that will be better than any in a book.

08/11/2012 at 18:11

Flowering rose; I so agree that nature is a brilliant garden designer. Have also noticed that agriculture has things to teach horticulture. A part of me would like my house to be simply surrounded by hay meadow.

08/11/2012 at 19:24

What a lovely place to walk and ride. We have gorse here in Dordogne, but no heather where I live - it's limestone and alkali. There are loads of cowslips in spring and masses and masses of wild cyclamen around a small local chateau which someone must have planted a long time ago and they've spread. There is a lot of forest, which I ride in on the tracks. I've seen deer, wild boar, stone martens and red squirrels.

10/11/2012 at 13:44

They have red deer here too but I am not sure about the wild boar,I think they are mainly noticeable in the forest of Dean.It sounds  lovely where you live,and I think we can learn a lot from nature around us.

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