London (change)
Today 9°C / 9°C
Tomorrow 11°C / 10°C
16 messages
13/07/2013 at 13:24

My relatively small pond has dropped about 2 inches.  With no water left in the water butts and no prospect of rain very soon, thinking of topping up from the mains supply, but letting the water stand for a couple of days in the water butts with the lids off to let the chlorine evaporate.  Any flaws to my idea?  I assume couple of days will be long enough.  I appreciate their may be nitrates I the water, but don't want water to drop even more as it will impact on the wild life in a garden who use it for drinking, washing and living!

13/07/2013 at 13:30

I think I'd do as you suggest Tim - but remember, the larger the surface area of the water the better the chlorine will evaporate, so if you've got several shallow containers to stand the water in for a while that would be better - good luck 

People who keep koi carp use water treatments for removing chlorine and other stuff from the tap water, but I've no idea how the treatment affects the myriad little creatures that live in a wildlife pond.

13/07/2013 at 14:32

Thanks Dove.  Ive read that if I  can aireate the water that helps the chlorine dissipate.  I've got the idea of lying on my back, mouth over the water butt tap and blowing as hard as I can.  What are my chances? 

13/07/2013 at 14:33

My little pond is 2m x 1m and 18ins deep. I top it up with tap water. A pond can lose up to 10cm a week in hot weather. Of course leaving it in containers a couple of days would be better, if you can cope with it.

13/07/2013 at 14:57

According to wikihow, vitamin C dechlorinates tap water - up to 100 gallons per tablet.  My chemistry isn't up to understanding why this would work, and I don't know if vitamin C is good for wildlife or not.  If there are any scientists out there who could explain, I'd love to know.  (Please speak very slowly, and use very short words)

13/07/2013 at 15:11

Suggest filling the water butt using a spray attachment on the hose.  This will take longer to fill it but it'll provide the best possible aeration and should allow a lot of the chlorine to disperse.

13/07/2013 at 15:15

At a previous house I used to attach the spray head to the hose and fix it onto the garden fork which was stuck in the ground beside the pond so that it was like a little fountain. I expect the quality of the water makes a big difference as well though. Our water is much softer generally.

13/07/2013 at 15:25

Tim, this is one subject I feel very confident advising on. FG is right. There is no harm in topping up your pond with tap water.  Use the sprayer as suggested so it is like rain water. This was what was advised by those in the know when I had to do urgent water changes about 4 years ago and which I have done ever since, when necessary.  Believe me, I have had a lot of experience with a blooming pond over the past 6 years which, until recently was full of Koi.

The advice I was given, by the way, iwas remove a third, fill with tap water and then do the same every other day.

15/07/2013 at 20:59

Topped up pond this evening from water butt, using tap water that I filled the butt using a garden sprinkler spray.  I found water butt pump and pumped the water into the pond, again using the shower spray, so it has been thru' sprayer twice.  Result was almost instant.  Could have sworn I saw a frog doing loop de loops in the topped up pond.  Several frogs seen heading towards the waters edge.  Pond now brimming! Thanks for help guys.

15/07/2013 at 22:38

I've done it the easy way. Hose on spray, hooked through fork  - Bingo. Job done.

16/07/2013 at 07:52

All comments very helpful.  I am new  to pond life, so I will fill my water butt today and transfer to pond tomorrow.  Is this long enough?  There are hundreds of froglets in my pond will they be ok?

16/07/2013 at 07:56

Hi Broggers- it should be fine. If you can use a spray head as suggested here already you'll get good aeration which is the key. I just used it straight from the tap through the spray headon hose but I'm in Scotland and our water is quite kind compared to some areas which may help. Hope you're getting great enjoyment from  your pond - lots of froglets is a good sign anyway 

17/07/2013 at 15:28

I work in aquatics

I would always say a tap water conditioner is vital when using mains water. Sure Chlorine is a gas will dissapate into the atmosphere. Cloromines (another time of disinfectant), however, do not. A condiditioner sorts that out though. And heavy metals too.

17/07/2013 at 15:32

Emma -we always used one when the children had fish tanks but never thought of using it in the pond as we didn't have fish in it! The ponds at my last house were spring fed so they had constant running water through them. Would you recommend that and what long term effects would there be to fish/wildlife if you don't?

18/07/2013 at 09:49

FG, tap water promotes algae growth as it tends to have high levels of nutrients. Chloramine contains ammonia and chlorine, which is toxic to any animals/fish/insects living in it Natural springs get a big thumbs up from me 

18/07/2013 at 09:55

Just topped up my koi pond with tap water.  I have no problem with algae. Regularly testing water is a must in this hot weather.

email image
16 messages