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flowering rose


 

What a lovely bank holiday weekend  just right for a walk in the countryside. The verges are full of wild flowers a month early. Comfrey and mustard are flowering and all those flowers we call weeds look stunning ,nature knows just how to do it! The trees  such as horse chestnut are flowering and look as thou they have candles .wonderful to see nature at its best ,lets hope it stays for awhile.

nutcutlet

cow parsley as well, lovely plant.

I could walk along that track

flowering rose

it is truly a lovely place to walk , along a river and through apple orchards .Its where we walked our dogs until recently one had to be put sleep and the other is an old boy too and can no longer walk far. but we do walk here on our own now and enjoy the countryside.

Fishy65

Am I right in thinking Cow Parsley is the same as Kek? We call it Kek around here and in May the country lanes are lined with its gorgeous white blooms 

nutcutlet

Cow parsley is Anthriscus sylvestris, is that Kek? My neighbour calls something kek but it's not cow parsley. My neighbour has some funny words, he kept talking about goom. Took me weeks to find out it was geum

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Fishy65

oops I spelt it kek when google says its 'keck'.Yes cow parsley also known as wild chervil,wild beaked parsley,keck or Queen Anne's Lace

nutcutlet

Queen Anne's Lace is most descriptive. I think I'll use that name from now

chicky

Much more elegant than cow parsley

Fishy65

lol no Keck is not a very elegant name is it.My Dad who is 84 always called it this,perhaps it is a localised name (Northamptonshire)

Jim Macd

 Queen Anne's Lace is wild carrot, sorry guys.

nutcutlet

Local names again Jim, nothing definitive. My mother called cow parsley Queen Anne's Lace.

I think the problem is that all those white umbellifers get lumped together and share names

Jim Macd

Hi nut, I really do have to disagree. I agree if you want you can say, "I call my cat a 'fish', and I call my dog a 'hippo'." That's fine, it really is, but it doesn't help communication. We have a few wonderful resources called the internet, Google, Google image, the library, books. All we have to do is use them. Now when I was a student a friend brought in a plant that none of us knew. "What is it?" we all asked. "The Indian Doctor Plant". So that's what we all called it, for a year. Then one person asked why is it called 'The Indian Doctor Plant'? Because the Indian Doctor gave us a cutting. We have brains if we only use them. We can learn and communicate better if only we want to. 

nutcutlet

Richard Mabey in Flora Britannica under Anthriscus sylvestris lists

Queen Anne's Lace, Fairy lace, Spanish lace. Kex, kecksie, Queque, Mother die, Step mother, Grandpas's pepper, Hedge parsley, Badman's oatmeal, Blackman's tobacco and rabbit meat  Not a bad collection.

Daucus carota just gets wild carrot and bird's nest.

I don't think you can have a right and wrong in common names. If it's what people call them it's the common name.

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pansyface

In Yorkshire, yer kecks are yer trousers. And yer bannickers are yer overalls.

nutcutlet

I know kecks pansyface but bannikers are new to me

pansyface

I don't think people wear bannickers any more. They were the old, dark blue type of thing that could hold an entire set of gas fitter's spanners and wrenches in the pocket of the bib. 

Jim Macd
nutcutlet wrote (see)

Richard Mabey in Flora Britannica under Anthriscus sylvestris lists

Queen Anne's Lace, Fairy lace, Spanish lace. Kex, kecksie, Queque, Mother die, Step mother, Grandpas's pepper, Hedge parsley, Badman's oatmeal, Blackman's tobacco and rabbit meat  Not a bad collection.

Daucus carota just gets wild carrot and bird's nest.

I don't think you can have a right and wrong in common names. If it's what people call them it's the common name.

Yes, if that's what people use then that's the name. However, if a 20% of people mean carrot, 20% of people mean cow parsley, 20% mean Bishop's Weed, 20% mean Hemlock and the other 20% mean any umbell then telling some Queen Anne's lace can be good to eat could get you into trouble. Common names are therefore pretty meaningless. But you can call it whatever you like. 

 

pansyface wrote (see)

In Yorkshire, yer kecks are yer trousers. And yer bannickers are yer overalls.

In Lancashire too. And Pants are Trousers and Troose are 'ladies Trousers'  And you don't get snowed under with work you get snood under in my family. 


nutcutlet

Ah. I think OH has something closely related. They came from an army surplus place. They'd been around a while. Very musty smell