How to make a green roof for your bird table

Find out how to attract more wildlife to your garden by adding a green roof to your bird table.

Do it:

Mar, Apr, May, Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep, Oct, Nov

Takes just:

one hour

Many of us will have birds that regularly visit our gardens, and it's easy to provide a home for them by building nest boxes or bird tables.

To encourage more wildlife to visit your garden, bird tables can be improved with an attractive living, green roof. The best plants to use for green roofs on your bird table are the smaller species of sedum, as they can withstand drought and grow on poor soil. To make it easier, you can buy ready-made sedum matting, which you simply cut to size and roll out.

Create a green roof for your bird table, with the help of our simple, five-step guide.

You will need

  • Bird table
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Water-retentive matting
  • Tape measure
  • Galvanised tacks
  • 1m of 50mm x 12mm timber batten
  • Screws and screwdriver
  • Sedum matting
  • Slow-release fertiliser

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Measure the roof of your bird table and cut some plastic sheeting to fit over it - this will act as a waterproof membrane. Secure it over the roof with galvanised tacks.

Cut the water-retentive matting to fit over the plastic sheeting and fix it to the roof of the bird table with galvanised tacks.

Use a saw to divide the timber batten into four pieces - one for each slope of the roof. Cut one end of each piece at a 45˚ angle so they fit neatly together at the apex of the roof. Drill some pilot holes into the timber, then screw the battens in place.

To encourage more wildlife to visit your garden, bird tables can be improved with an attractive living, green roof.

Use a craft knife to cut the sedum matting to size, then lay it over the roof of the bird table.

Sprinkle the sedum mat with a slow-release fertiliser and water.

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Kate Bradbury

Kate Bradbury says

Green roofs on bin stores, sheds and bird tables increase the area of green space in your garden. By planting flowering plants you further improve the habitat by attracting pollinating insects. Some of these will be attractive to birds, meaning they won’t have to travel far in search of live food to feed to their chicks.

Discover more ideas and inspiration

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