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Blossom end rot

Symptoms

Just when your tomatoes, peppers and aubergines are starting to ripen, they develop a mass of spots at the end of the fruit. These merge to form a sunken, leathery, dark brown area.
Find it on: tomatoes, peppers, aubergines
Time to act: summer to autumn

Overview

Blossom end rot is caused by calcium deficiency. Without calcium, a plant's cell walls collapse and die, resulting in the bruised appearance of the fruits. Plants take up calcium from the soil through their roots, so if it's dry, the calcium stays locked in the soil and the plant suffers. Acid soils always have low levels of calcium. If treated early, later fruits will go on to ripen successfully. The problem can also be triggered by applying fertiliser to dry soil.
Solution
Just when your tomatoes, peppers and aubergines are starting to ripen, they develop a mass of spots at the end of the fruit. These merge to form a sunken, leathery, dark brown area.
Organic
Don't allow the soil around the plant's roots to dry out. Water plants regularly, as even a short period of drought can encourage the problem. Compost sold specifically for tomatoes, such as grow bags, contains sufficient calcium for a good crop of fruits. Never apply fertiliser to dry soil, always give plants plenty of water first.



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Talkback: Blossom end rot
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janicef 24/11/2011 at 15:29

Some of my tomatoes have blossom end rot. I have them in my greenhouse. If I take off the the bad fruit, will the rest be ok. What is the best treatment for this problem please. Many thanks. janicef.

rmorgan 24/11/2011 at 15:29

i have conifers turning brown what can i try to green them up

Peat B 09/12/2011 at 16:10

I agree with the feeding of the plants. A little but often, avoiding the leaves, and not too much liquid around the base of the stem. This could cause rot if it is continuously watered here.