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Codling moth

Symptoms

Holes often visible in ripe fruit. When the fruit is cut open, the tunnel made by the maggot-like caterpillar will be seen, lined with its droppings or frass.

Find it on: apples, pears, quince, walnuts
Time to act: spring, summer

Overview

The adult codling moths lay their eggs on or near developing fruit. These eggs hatch into small white caterpillars, which eat their way into the fruit and feed inside while it's developing. The caterpillars may be found inside the fruit at harvest time, but have usually eaten their way out to overwinter on the bark of the tree. They will then pupate and hatch into adult moths the following spring, ready to mate.


Solution

Holes often visible in ripe fruit. When the fruit is cut open, the tunnel made by the maggot-like caterpillar will be seen, lined with its droppings or frass.

Organic

Remove infected fruit as soon as any damage is evident to limit overwintering caterpillars. Control is available in the form of pheromone traps that catch male moths in April and May.




Discuss this problem

Talkback: Codling moth
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kaycurtis 24/11/2011 at 15:27

relly helpful to have these features before the isects and moths do their damage as it is a quick reminder to do the job rather than trawling through books once you have the proble and it's too late to do any thing about it, don't get me wrong I love books and wouldn't be with out them.

kaycurtis 24/11/2011 at 15:27

after thought I am sorry I spelt really incorrectly

audrey23 24/11/2011 at 15:29

I think that this is really helpful as we have had this problem and it really takes over your fruit (in our case, pears), and you're left with spoilt fruit instead of a lovely succulent crop.

audrey23 24/11/2011 at 15:29

I know that this isn't quite the same thing but this Summer I'd some small (fingernail size and smaller), white.....looked like cotton wool, on the joints of branches and knotches of our 'Japanese acer', which is in a large pot of acid soil. I removed them all (there was a lot of it) with tissue but I daren't look in the tissue (just a wee bit squeamish). I was wondering if they were the same thing or not?

audrey23 24/11/2011 at 15:29

I would have liked someone to have given me an answer to my problems, it's nearly two months since I left thse comments.

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