Apple sawfly

Time to act:

Jun, Jul, Aug

When apple trees are in flower, the sawfly, Hoplocampa testudinea, lays its eggs in the developing fruit. In June, the larvae tunnel their way under the skin of the fruit and into the core, causing the apples to fall. When they're ready, they tunnel out of the apples, creating a second hole, and then bury themselves in the soil to pupate. Sometimes the larvae die and don't make it to the middle of the apple, in which case the apples mature, but they'll have ribbon scars and are sometimes misshapen.

Symptoms

The larvae of the sawfly damage the apples, either causing fruitlets to fall in June, or those that are left on the tree gradually become ribbon-scarred and are sometimes misshapen.

Find it on

apples

Advertisement

Organic

Closely examine young fruits on the tree or on the ground, and destroy any that show signs of entrance holes. This stops the larvae from escaping into the soil and pupating. Rake the soil around affected trees in winter, so the exposed sawflies are killed by frost.

Advertisement

Discover more ideas and inspiration

Related content

Wasp damage on apples and pears

Wasps

Woolly aphids

How to store apples

Related offers

SAVE 20%

Save 20% on fruit trees

Save 20 per cent on this collection of three cordon fruit trees, including cherry, plum and apple. Or, save 15 per cent when you buy a single tree.

Order now

Offer

Subscriber only content

Two free* blueberry plants

Claim two 9cm-potted blueberry plants, worth over £16.99, for free - *just pay £5.65 for postage. You can also add any other plants to your order and pay no extra postage.

Unlock now

SAVE 20%

Subscriber only content

Save 20% on raspberries

Save over 20 per cent when you order the summer and autumn raspberry cane collection, comprising 'Glen Ample' and 'Polka', for just £22.90 (normally £28.90).

Unlock now