Reversion

Time to act:

Jun, Jul, Aug, Mar, Apr, May, Dec, Jan, Feb, Sep, Oct, Nov

Sometimes shoots appear on previously plain-leaved plants with attractive variegations, and these can then be propagated by nurserymen to make a new plant. But the new variegated plant might try to revert to all-green foliage because the mutation isn't stable. If left, this all-green growth, which will be more vigorous than the variegated kind, will take over the plant.

Symptoms

Variegated leaves are caused by natural mutations, but these mutations aren't always a stable, permanent feature, and the plant might try to revert to the original, all-green leaves.

Find it on

any variegated plant

Advertisement

Organic

The only solution is to cut back any all-green growth to leave just the desired variegated foliage.

Advertisement

Discover more ideas and inspiration

Related content

How to remove dead wood from plants

How to prune a climbing rose

Clematis wilt

Rose powdery mildew

Related offers

Offer

Subscriber only content

Claim 50 free* freesias

Freesias are fantastically fragrant and make a wonderful cut flower. Claim a pack of 50 double-flowered freesia bulbs for free - *just pay £5.65 for postage. Also, order any additional plants from Hayloft and pay no extra postage.

Unlock now

HALF PRICE

Half price collections

Buy a collection of three dwarf azaleas or rhododendrons for just £18 (half price). Or, save £42 when you buy both collections for just £30. Plants are supplied in 12cm pots.

Order now

Offer

Save 35% on clematis

Snap up a 'Boulevard' patio clematis collection, including three established compact varieties, for just £12.99 (saving 35% on the RRP).

Order now