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Alina W


Latest posts by Alina W

Magnolia

Posted: 25/04/2012 at 10:06

Cross-posted, Goldilocks

I don't know about Lincs, but there were a few magnolias which turned up their toes after the very cold winter we had here, hence my thought that it would probably be OK to re-plant.

Magnolia

Posted: 25/04/2012 at 10:03

Two things come to mind - waterlogging and low temperatures. If you had a very cold winter in 2010, it might have weakened the tree, and a second cold spell finished it off.

Re-planting in the same area - you would need to improve the soil, as the tree will have taken a lot out of it, but other than that I think you'd be OK.

Lilac shoots all over the place...

Posted: 25/04/2012 at 09:56

What you're suggesting isn't practical - digging up an old tree risks killing it from root damage, and cutting off most of its roots is likely to finish it off. Further, trees respond to root damage by suckering, so wherever you damage the roots, you will get more suckers (if the tree survives).

The way to treat suckers is to brush back the soil to expose the sucker, then either cut it very close to the root or tear it off. It is a perennial problem with lilac, but controllable if you keep on top of it.

Montana wilt?

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 21:57

Clematis don't like wet feet, so it may have suffered. Another possibility is that slugs have stripped the stems of their bark at ground level.

Talkback: Earwigs

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 21:46

FloBear, there are safe slug pellets - Growing Success Advanced Slug Pellets - which are only toxic to slugs and snails. They are harmless to hedgehogs even if they eat the corpses, which they are very unlikely to.

I've been using them since they came out, and still have my hedgehogs, and a plethora of frogs and birds.

Talkback: Hail damage

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 21:18

Bruising such as you describe is quite common from hail, yes.

Dahlia Giving up the Ghost

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 16:59

I was going to suggest a compost issue. There's no chance that they've been burnt by the sun, is there?

Iberia

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 16:57

I'm hoping that my aubretia will recover from the torrential rain we've had - the poor thing has almost been flattened. Such a pretty colour, too - blue with a white eye.

tulips

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 16:07

It could be rabbits or mice - probably the latter if the chew marks are tiny. The only preventative measure that I can think of is a fine wire cage that you stand over the tulips at night - or mouse traps.

Iberia

Posted: 24/04/2012 at 15:53

Do you mean iberis - perennial candytuft? If you do then yes, cut back to about half size after flowering.

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