AliP


Latest posts by AliP

Cordylines

Posted: 28/02/2012 at 13:43

Maybe worth checking out this link as I have come across a lot that have suffered from this, especially 2010-2011 winter. 

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?pid=552

Usually though like Fonzie said they start shooting around the base of the trunk and you can then just cut the old trunk down to ground level.
www.alisonpike.com/blog/

Bees, Butterflies and Blooms

Posted: 28/02/2012 at 13:30

Excellent series! I'm inspired and will be design a wildflower area into my garden. I've also noticed an area at my son's school which would be perfect and a real opportunity for the children at the school to get involved... watch this space!
Lainey - that's great that your council does so much already, it makes sense...less mowing, weeding etc. win, win financial and ecological!
www.alisonpike.com/blog/

Coral Spot

Posted: 24/02/2012 at 10:03

I have a beautiful large Acer that has developed coral spot. I thought it only effected dead wood but it seems to be causing the dead wood? Having previously cut off the effected limbs it has now spread into one of the main trunks (the tree splits into two main trunks at the base). Am I going to have to lose this tree altogether? I'm clinging to the hope there maybe another way!! Thanks

Snowdrops and bees

Posted: 23/02/2012 at 20:24

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/5727.jpg?width=341&height=350&mode=max

Just thought I would share this. I was working in a border today that was full of snowdrops and the sound of all the bees was unbelievable.  There were just so many of them (although they seemed reluctant to stay in one place for the camera!).  I gorgeous sunny, warm day, surrounded by wildlife and flowers..... doesn't get much better than that!
www.alisonpike.com/blog/

sambucus black lace cutting back? confusing advice

Posted: 22/02/2012 at 13:28

You can treat them a couple of ways. Firstly like you mentioned by pruning them back hard in early spring, treating them much like you would a buddleja. This method tends to get the best leaf colour out of them.  Secondly is to let it get on with it and just give it a light prune here and there to keep it in check. If the thought of cutting it right back is a little daunting you could always just cut a stem or two down to ground level, this should help to bulk it out too.  Good luck. 
www.alisonpike.com/blog/

Talkback: Preparing for drought in the garden

Posted: 22/02/2012 at 12:51

<span id="sample-permalink">I've just done a post about this on my blog as it will be effecting so many of us.  I'm in the early stages of developing a new garden having moved house and plants that can really tolerate dry conditions are going to be high up on my wish list! Perhaps I should forget a traditional lawn and go for a wildflower one instead?http://www.alisonpike.com/blog/?p=414

Snowdrops

Posted: 18/02/2012 at 14:17

Hi Jan, it's the beautiful Rococo Gardens Painswick.  I visited & took photo on Wednesday it really is breathtaking the photo doesn't do it justice! I've got link on my blog if you want to check it out. <span id="sample-permalink">http://www.alisonpike.com/blog/?p=374

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Snowdrops

Posted: 17/02/2012 at 18:29

<span id="sample-permalink">I just thought I would share these..... how beautiful! For me they really herald the start of the growing season and I know it won't be too long till spring is upon us. Yay!

<span><span id="sample-permalink">http://www.alisonpike.com/blog/?p=374

<span>

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/5656.jpg?width=768&height=350&mode=max

composting

Posted: 09/02/2012 at 14:43

Citrus peel always used to be abit controversial in the composting world 'it won't break down very quickly', 'the compost will become acidic', etc.  However the view on it now is it's fine, so don't worry about adding it to your compost heap.  Like everything in life - its about variety and not too much of any one thing, stick to that and your compost should be fine!  Yes, sawdust and wood shavings from untreated wood is fine, again just a little at a time and make sure its mixed with lots of other stuff.
www.alisonpike.com/blog/

rosemary

Posted: 07/02/2012 at 14:47

If branches have split with the weight of snow best just to prune those splits so you are leaving a clean cut. Then what I would do is wait until spring to assess what life is left in the remaining half.  It maybe that it's left you with such an oddly shaped plant you are best to just replace it or you could try to prune it back into shape.  Be careful about pruning it too much in spring if it has already gone through the shock of losing its top half. Fingers crossed!   www.alisonpike.com/blog/

Discussions started by AliP

Mysterious unknown plants

Help I don't know what these are and will probably kick myself when someone tells me!! 
Replies: 7    Views: 774
Last Post: 20/09/2012 at 19:01

Tulipa 'Spring Green'

Replies: 5    Views: 523
Last Post: 25/04/2012 at 16:18

Heuchera's

Replies: 26    Views: 26398
Last Post: 06/05/2014 at 13:48

Coral Spot

Replies: 0    Views: 505
Last Post: 24/02/2012 at 10:03

Snowdrops and bees

Replies: 1    Views: 991
Last Post: 29/02/2012 at 14:51

Snowdrops

Spot the snowdrop 
Replies: 7    Views: 1259
Last Post: 19/02/2012 at 07:36
6 threads returned