babsagain


Latest posts by babsagain

9 returned

brown spots on gooseberries

Posted: 03/07/2014 at 18:40

Thanks for the thoughts.  It is definitely not mildew, more like the little scabs referred to.  Inside the fruit is fine.  I have just cut across the berries to remove the marks before freezing. (I have only just finished eating last year's crop)

brown spots on gooseberries

Posted: 03/07/2014 at 16:04

A lot of my gooseberries are marked as described.  At first I thought it might be the result of damage from a nasty hailstorm a few weeks ago; now the marks are on gooseberries buried deep in the bush.  I don't recall having this problem before and I have been growing this fruit for many years.  I can't find anything in answer to a search on the internet.  The only g.berry related problem that shows is American mildew and it is definitely not that.  I grow Invicta, which are immune, and all the foliage is green and healthy.  Can anyone shed light on this mystery.......please.

Anemone Wild Swan

Posted: 25/08/2013 at 10:48

I, too, have purchased anemone 'wild swan' from Hayloft Plants.  The first batch of three were potted up and kept indoors away from the fierce temperatures of early July.  They struggled along and one just keeled over.  I emailed Hayloft and, to their credit, they sent me another batch of three.  They too are proving reluctant to flourish.  I have learned that they don't like being too damp and in the end I have placed them outside the greenhouse and told them to get on with it.  So far the largest three of the remaining plants are just about holding their own and I am hoping to be able to plant them out, perhaps under a cloche to keep slugs off, in the next couple of weeks.

I have bought a lot of plug plants over the years and have had a good success rate with the majority.  I prefer to buy larger plants but it is not always possible to find what you want in this way.  Guess I'll have to try looking a bit harder.

Happy gardening to one and all.

Growing blueberries

Posted: 05/10/2012 at 12:48

I have several blueberry bushes growing in pots of acid soil.  I am considering growing them as follows - dig a suitably sized trench; line with either fabric weed control material (which is porous) or plastic sheeting pierced to allow drainage; and filled with ericaceous soil.  I am not sure if the porous fabric would lead to a 'leeching-out' of the acidic qualities of the new soil.  Has anyone any experience of this method?  Any comments or advice would be much appreciated.

Growing blueberries

Posted: 15/08/2012 at 13:05

Christopher2

I now have 5 poppy plants in a large terracotta bowl filled with acid compost and sunk into the garden where it gets morning sun and some afternoon shade.  They have been there two years now and apart from applying rainwater when the weather is dry I just leave them to get on with it.  2 of the plants are several years old and were tranplanted from another, smaller pot which just stood on the garden.  I had lots of flowers this year and have left the seedheads to drop where they will.  If any seedlings pop up I will pot them on.  I have never managed to grow them  from seed myself.  Happy planting.

acidanthera

Posted: 15/08/2012 at 10:10

I bought 40 acidenthera bulbs at Cardiff flower show in April.  When I checked on growing conditions and saw they were not fully hardy, I split them up between six large plastic pots and sank them into the ground.  They have all flowered prolifically, despite the rain here in Wales.  I am thinking of growing tulips this way as I am always slicing them up when trying to put summer plants in.

Back to the acidanthera - they are not much like other gladioli as their flowers are well separated but they are tall and beautiful and shine out even on dull days.  Don't give up, Josie4, but do try feeding the bulbs after they have flowered to help them 'stock up' for next year.

Growing blueberries

Posted: 14/08/2012 at 19:27

Many thanks for your answer.  I do actually grow blue poppies this way and they have been alright for the last couple of years, so - trench planting with pots it is!

Growing blueberries

Posted: 14/08/2012 at 14:08

I thought that might be a danger.  I want to move them because they are taking up space on a large concrete area that I want to use for a shed.  When I first had them I built a smallish fruit cage but the plants have grown quite tall and I hoped, by sinking them into the ground, I could carry on using the fruit cage. (We have lots of hungry blackbirds who aren't averse to raiding the bushes!).  I suppose I could sink the pots into the ground, still surrounding them with ericaceous compost, and just keep an eye on them.  Many thanks for taking the trouble to answer.

 

Barbara J

Growing blueberries

Posted: 14/08/2012 at 11:52

I have several blueberry bushes growing in pots of ericaceous soil.  I am thinking of digging a trench in the garden and filling it with this kind of compost in an effort to give them a proper 'home'.  Has anyone tried this before? - and does it work?.  Any comment would be welcomed.

Barbara J.

9 returned

Discussions started by babsagain

brown spots on gooseberries

simple and pitted spots on a lot of gooseberry fruits 
Replies: 6    Views: 167
Last Post: 03/07/2014 at 18:40

Growing blueberries

Growing blueberry bushes directly into non-acid soil 
Replies: 14    Views: 1165
Last Post: 08/10/2012 at 18:50

Growing blueberries

Replies: 10    Views: 1038
Last Post: 15/08/2012 at 13:55
3 threads returned