Bee witched


Latest posts by Bee witched

1 to 10 of 164

Chocolate Cosmos - how to care for

Posted: 20/06/2016 at 22:27

Hi Rob,


They are half-hardy perennials so will need protection to try and keep them for next year.


In autumn after the foliage has died back reduce the stems to within 5cm (2in) of the roots. Lay in a tray of soil or compost and over-winter in a frost-free environment until early spring.

Horizontally growing shrubs

Posted: 20/06/2016 at 07:51

Hi Laraine,


When you come to prune them (check online for the right time for each shrub), make sure you prune to an upwards facing bud. That way the new growth will be pointing in the direction you want it to go.


There is a saying "growth follows the knife" ... so be bold when you prune  ... it will pay off.

Rounding up the slugs

Posted: 18/06/2016 at 07:50

Hi,


I agree with Dove that nematodes are the way to go.


I've got a large garden so need to buy the 100 sq m pack. Not cheap but so worth it.


I applied during early May ... and have just re-applied.


I still do an occasional evening "slug hunt" ... if it's warm and damp ... ideal slug weather. In the past I would have got 400+  .... the total caught is usually <20. The hostas have never looked so nice ... and the erythroniums were lovely this year too.


I figure that the cost is equivalent to buying a couple of plants ... so put like that it doesn't seem too bad if it saves things I've already got.


I also get to spend more time gardening rather than constantly slug hunting. 

Gooseberry leaves

Posted: 13/06/2016 at 20:37

Hi,


I also use a spray of diluted neem oil .... it is totally organic. I've had no gooseberry sawfly problems for the last 5 years ... and great crops of berries.


See this link for further info.


http://www.discoverneem.com/neem-oil-insecticide.html


and this one for how to make it.


http://www.discoverneem.com/neem-insect-spray.html


I use it as soon as growth starts in April and I drench the foliage. Any spare solution goes onto the soil below as the earthworms are supposed to love it. I repeat spray every few weeks.


Neem is best used preventatively .... but will work on pests that have already arrived. It  does not hurt beneficial insects. Only chewing and sucking insects are affected. The main reason is that insects need to ingest the neem oil to be affected, and beneficial insects don't eat your plants. However, you can still kill beneficial insects if you smother them with neem oil, so I tend to spray late evening to be safe.


It does stink a bit ... but is easy to mix up and apply.


I got mine off ebay .... wasn't expensive for a big bottle which will last ages. At room temperature it is solid, but goes liquid again within a couple of hours in the airing cupboard.


Worth a try .... also seems to work well for lily beetle and aphids.

Liming effect on slugs?

Posted: 12/06/2016 at 20:02

Hi Honeysuckle5,


I can really recommend the nematodes .... I've got a large garden so needed to buy the 100 sq m pack. Not cheap but so worth it.


I applied during early May.


I went out the recently on an evening "slug hunt" ... it was warm and damp ... ideal slug weather. In the past I would have got 400+  .... the total caught was 8. The hostas have never looked so nice ... and the erythroniums were lovely this year too.


I'll be buying another pack for applying in late June. I figure that the cost is equivalent to buying a couple of plants ... so put like that it doesn't seem too bad if it saves things I've already got.I also get to spend time gardening rather than constantly slug hunting. 

Using cut grass to keep strawberries off the soil

Posted: 09/06/2016 at 22:20

I have access to loads of fir cones and tuck these under the fruits as needed. This keeps them off the soil, and seems to help save them from slug damage in wet summers.

Bee & Butterfly Friendly Plants

Posted: 07/06/2016 at 14:55

Hi,


I keep honeybees and try and plant a succession of things so that they have food sources from early spring onwards. Snowdrop and aconites are both great early plants .... and will disappear underground by late spring leaving a space for something else to follow.


Phacelia tanacetifolia, poppies and Limnanthes douglasii(also known as poached egg plants) are all easy from seed and will seed about for future years. Borage is also very popular with bees and butterflies. 


Finally, you can't beat sedums for late summer.

I stand with Pansyface

Posted: 03/06/2016 at 10:38

Best wishes to Pansy ..... total over-reaction by the mods.


Back in 2 days!

Slup pellets

Posted: 31/05/2016 at 07:57

HI All,


I can really recommend the nematodes .... I've got a large garden so needed to buy the 100 sq m pack. Not cheap but so worth it.


I applied during early May.


I went out the recently on an evening "slug hunt" ... it was warm and damp ... ideal slug weather. In the past I would have got 400+  .... the total caught was 8. The hostas have never looked so nice ... and the erythroniums were lovely this year too.


I'll be buying another pack for applying in late June. I figure that the cost is equivalent to buying a couple of plants ... so put like that it doesn't seem too bad if it saves things I've already got.


I also get to spend time gardening rather than constantly slug hunting. 

Progress update

Posted: 30/05/2016 at 21:39

Hi Daniel .... any chance of getting the hovering back .... it was v. useful.


Ta

1 to 10 of 164

Discussions started by Bee witched

NOT perfect for pollinators ....

Replies: 9    Views: 620
Last Post: 02/04/2016 at 17:12

Neonicotinoids and bees

Replies: 2    Views: 469
Last Post: 28/05/2015 at 19:57

Companion thugs

Replies: 2    Views: 489
Last Post: 03/05/2015 at 01:20

Oh No!!

Replies: 6    Views: 884
Last Post: 22/12/2013 at 14:28
4 threads returned