Latest posts by Berghill


Posted: 26/06/2015 at 14:27

All to do with the particle size. Soft sand has smaller, more rounded particles so it sticks together. Sharp sand has larger more angular particles so it falls apart.

Rub it between your fingers, sharp sand feels gritty. Soft sand will make a ball when squeezed.

Sharp sand is what you need for adding to soil.

A couple of IDs please.

Posted: 26/06/2015 at 14:24

First is a Poppy  of some description, but which one????

The shrub is Spiraea, not sure of the species, but bumalda is a possibility.

Plant ID

Posted: 26/06/2015 at 14:22

As you surmise, the first one is Alchemilla mollis. Dead head it before it seeds all over the place. I just take shears and cut it all off at a few inches high. It regrows.

The second is Hypericum perforatum  possibly, but defo a Hypericum

monkshood/devils helmet/aconitum

Posted: 26/06/2015 at 14:15

We have a lot of varieties of Aconitum in the garden from pure white through blue to yellow. They are no more poisonous than, as Nutculet says, half the other plants in the garden. I spent half an hour this morning removing seed heads from one, no gloves and lots of scratches on the hands. My heart is still beating at the same rate as it normally does. My wife will let you know if I die!

Sad daphne

Posted: 25/06/2015 at 21:27

Are you sure it actually has roots? I ask as I have had cuttings sit in the cuttings frame for a year with nice green leaves before dying and no sign of roots. They do need bottom heat and a mist unit to really root.

Will wood bark as a mulch cause nitrate deficiency?

Posted: 25/06/2015 at 21:23

Agree. We have been putting shredded bark from our garden on the beds for 20 years and there is no sign of nitrogen loss.

recycling plant pots?

Posted: 25/06/2015 at 21:19

How sad, we took ours to The Grosvenor Garden Centre near Chester, but our local Recycling Depot does not deal with them. Terrible waste really.


Posted: 25/06/2015 at 17:48

John Innes No 3. But I have to say that our Jostaberry shrubs are huge. Not sure they would fit in any post unless it too was large, like twice the size Logan reckons.

Mystery Plant

Posted: 25/06/2015 at 17:44

Hard to tell from such a blurred and tiny image, but the flower looks like one of the New Zealand periwinkle relatives. Parahebe species.

Damson leaf blisters

Posted: 25/06/2015 at 12:08

We get that. I think it is the trees reaction to the biting of aphids etc. Personally I ignore it and we still get hundredweight of fruit, most years.

That is, unless, there are yellow spots on the top of the blister and brown spots on the underside of the leaf on the opposite side to the blister. In that case it could be Plum rust. Mind that is not a major problem either as it rarely in Britain damages the tree significantly.

Discussions started by Berghill

Monty Don and Potting compost

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The Bee Border

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The mole hole to end all moleholes

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Olearia pruning

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Alpines for All

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Slup pellets

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Iris sibirica

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Fascinating discovery

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Last Post: 08/12/2015 at 18:19

How very frustrating.......

Replies: 11    Views: 1713
Last Post: 12/12/2015 at 12:53

More work!

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Last Post: 02/11/2015 at 09:14

Silly question of the day!

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Last Post: 22/10/2015 at 21:12

Ptilostemon afer

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Bearded Iris

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Nectaroscordum siculum

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Last Post: 15/06/2015 at 15:40
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