Berghill


Latest posts by Berghill

Camellia - seed pods

Posted: 13/09/2015 at 16:19

Watch out for molluscs. The seedlings which I got this year were destroyed in one night of mollusc mayhem. My fault I should have found somewhere safe from predators..

Confused by cyclamen

Posted: 12/09/2015 at 11:52

The ones sold by Homebase et all are versions of C. persicum and they are only hardy down to about -2c.. And then only in well drained soil.

There is a hardeir C. persicum from the Golan Heights in Lebanon, but it is not that easy to come by.

Allium Cernum

Posted: 10/09/2015 at 20:49

And if you are like me, then you will have millions of them all around! They seed if you do not get around to dead heading them.

Transplanting Leeks

Posted: 08/09/2015 at 14:39

And the grit inside the leeks is easy enough to remove when preparing for cooking. Slice off the unwanted green tops and the roots and stand the usable bits upside down in water, the grit soon drops out.

Another Plant ID please.

Posted: 07/09/2015 at 17:47

The pink flower belongs to Himalayan Balsam. A rather invasive annual.

ID please

Posted: 07/09/2015 at 17:43

Changed my mind, it is a Chelone. Senior moment, as I was looking at Phyostegia in the garden just before I came on.

ID please

Posted: 07/09/2015 at 16:18

2nd is Physostegia virginiana, the Obedient plant, because the flowers stay where you move them to on the stem.

Cannot help on the first, don't do indoor plants.

 

Damsons?

Posted: 07/09/2015 at 13:51

They are either Bullace (wild plums) or as you think Damsons. Some of the Bullace are nice enough to eat, bit others are incredibly sour. Damsons are tart. No fruit I can think of in Britain matches your description which is   toxic.

Pictures are posted from PC's by Clicking on the GreenTree symbol

Leaf Question

Posted: 06/09/2015 at 21:21

There have been a lot of shrubs with chlorotic leaves like this, this year. We have had in on Honeysuckles, Viburnum, Roses and different types of Budlejas too. We think it was as a result of the very changeable temperatures and varying amounts of rain in early Spring. Many of our shrubs have now got proper green leaves and many of the yellow ones have fallen over the Summer.

I think with a little luck, they will all recover next year.

What causes rust on plants

Posted: 06/09/2015 at 12:19

It is a  fungus, so theoretically any fungicide should deal with it. Damp airless conditions tend to help it develop, so getting good airflow round plants does help......a little.

Discussions started by Berghill

A Few May Flowers

 
Replies: 9    Views: 282
Last Post: 24/05/2017 at 18:27

Liverwort on seed pots

 
Replies: 6    Views: 157
Last Post: 19/05/2017 at 20:45

Shrub id

 
Replies: 3    Views: 197
Last Post: 05/05/2017 at 20:55

Barnardia numidica

 
Replies: 0    Views: 96
Last Post: 16/03/2017 at 11:17

Oemleria cerasiformis

 
Replies: 5    Views: 210
Last Post: 15/03/2017 at 20:35

Hellebores

 
Replies: 7    Views: 591
Last Post: 14/01/2017 at 20:50

Monty Don and Potting compost

Replies: 30    Views: 1973
Last Post: 26/10/2016 at 17:05

The Bee Border

 
Replies: 22    Views: 1630
Last Post: 14/08/2016 at 17:31

The mole hole to end all moleholes

 
Replies: 7    Views: 551
Last Post: 17/07/2016 at 16:16

Olearia pruning

 
Replies: 0    Views: 363
Last Post: 05/07/2016 at 08:57

Alpines for All

 
Replies: 5    Views: 617
Last Post: 16/06/2016 at 17:27

Slup pellets

 
Replies: 13    Views: 1143
Last Post: 09/06/2016 at 20:26

Iris sibirica

Replies: 8    Views: 956
Last Post: 19/06/2016 at 11:46

Fascinating discovery

Replies: 14    Views: 1890
Last Post: 08/12/2015 at 18:19

How very frustrating.......

Replies: 11    Views: 1845
Last Post: 12/12/2015 at 12:53
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