Berghill


Latest posts by Berghill

Last year's Sweet Williams

Posted: 21/02/2016 at 17:43

Actually short lived perennials which are grown as biennials. Some of mine are  in their 4th year now. All I do is cut them back when they have finished flowered. It seems to suit them.

Feeding with a high potash feed does help them flower.

How do snowdrops naturally divide?

Posted: 20/02/2016 at 14:23

The straight G. nivalis which we have elsewhere,do set seed. It is only the ones in our wood which appear to be sterile.


 

How do snowdrops naturally divide?

Posted: 20/02/2016 at 12:08

The Galanthus in our Wood do not seem to set seed, looked every year for seed, but never found any and the ovaries seem to be empty too. However, they are spread rather expertly by the moles.

Shredder

Posted: 19/02/2016 at 20:36

We have this one too. Not as good as their original one, but better than any of the other makes of this type.

Professional petrol driven ones are better still, but very expensive and for a normal size garden, not worth the effort.

Viburnum Opulus Cranberry Bush

Posted: 19/02/2016 at 14:21

Fruit - raw or cooked. Juicy but acid, the taste is best after a frost'

The fruits are rich in vitamin C.

They are an excellent substitute for cranberries and are used in preserves, jams etc.

A jam made from the fruit has a very pleasant flavour that goes well in a porridge.

Plant ID please

Posted: 18/02/2016 at 20:40

Has the look of Ragweed, the seeds of which are often included in Bird feeding mixes.

Viburnum Opulus Cranberry Bush

Posted: 18/02/2016 at 17:42

Large quantities of the fruit can cause vomiting and diarrhoea.  The fruit is of very low or zero toxicity, it only causes mild upsets when eaten unripe or in large quantities

Talkback: Shrubs that flower in February

Posted: 15/02/2016 at 15:30

And at £44.95 for a small one, Edgeworthia is a bit pricey for us, as well as being too tender.

Anyone done any gardening today - Version 2

Posted: 14/02/2016 at 14:43

Managed to remove the old leaves from some of the Pulsatillas. They are going to be very early this year, looking at the buds

Snowdrops

Posted: 14/02/2016 at 14:41

The snails and slugs here have survived this winter, so far and they definitely eat Snowdrop petals. However, I think that under normal conditions, the petals desiccate very quickly down to a tiny brown wisp,which drops on to the soil and is hard to see.

Discussions started by Berghill

Vine Weevil frustration

 
Replies: 13    Views: 312
Last Post: Yesterday at 17:09

Urgent -re Damsons

 
Replies: 8    Views: 407
Last Post: 18/08/2017 at 21:21

Pheasant damage

 
Replies: 5    Views: 391
Last Post: 12/08/2017 at 16:56

Two shrubs for id

 
Replies: 3    Views: 296
Last Post: 13/06/2017 at 20:34

A Few May Flowers

 
Replies: 9    Views: 490
Last Post: 24/05/2017 at 18:27

Liverwort on seed pots

 
Replies: 6    Views: 332
Last Post: 19/05/2017 at 20:45

Shrub id

 
Replies: 3    Views: 355
Last Post: 05/05/2017 at 20:55

Barnardia numidica

 
Replies: 0    Views: 222
Last Post: 16/03/2017 at 11:17

Oemleria cerasiformis

 
Replies: 5    Views: 325
Last Post: 15/03/2017 at 20:35

Hellebores

 
Replies: 7    Views: 804
Last Post: 14/01/2017 at 20:50

Monty Don and Potting compost

Replies: 30    Views: 2756
Last Post: 26/10/2016 at 17:05

The Bee Border

 
Replies: 22    Views: 1998
Last Post: 14/08/2016 at 17:31

The mole hole to end all moleholes

 
Replies: 7    Views: 692
Last Post: 17/07/2016 at 16:16

Olearia pruning

 
Replies: 0    Views: 592
Last Post: 05/07/2016 at 08:57

Alpines for All

 
Replies: 5    Views: 842
Last Post: 16/06/2016 at 17:27
1 to 15 of 53 threads