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Berghill


Latest posts by Berghill

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 20:50

And some in the garden

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32694.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Aster ericoides horizontalis

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32695.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Gypsophila tenuifolia

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32696.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Allium thunbergii album

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32697.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Allium thunbergii

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32698.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Anemone japonica Honorine de Joubert

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 20:47

Still a lot of colour about too.

These are in the Alpine house

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32689.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Campanula fragilis

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32690.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Oxalis perdicaria Maloborba

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32691.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Oxalis perdicaria Cetrino

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32692.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Oxalis Anne Christie

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32693.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Oxalis hirta

Linseed is different from flaxseed grown for fibres

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 20:42

Snap.

Linseed is different from flaxseed grown for fibres

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 20:42

Linum usitatissimum is the one used to produce Linseed oil.

As far as I can find out, this is also the one used to produce the fibres used to make Linen.

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 14:29

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32677.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Shade House

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32678.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Tunnel right

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32679.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Tunnel left.

Hope they all survive the Winter.

Garden Gallery 2013

Posted: 19/10/2013 at 14:27

All the frames (and we have a 30 foot long run of them) are full of baby plants, the Tunnel is full of baby plants, the shade house is full of plants, her greenhouse is full of seedlings and the Cuttings frame is packed with not ready to plant up baby plants. I think I might have gone a tad over the top this year.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32672.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 The greenhouse

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32673.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 A frame

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32674.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 A frame

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32675.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 Cuttings frame

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/32676.jpg?width=480&height=350&mode=max

 More full frames

 

RUBBLE IN GARDEN

Posted: 18/10/2013 at 21:23

If you can, then get rid. We have taken over 30 tons of  rubbish like this from the garden (and yes I do mean 30).

However, many of our grass paths still have a thick layer of broken brick etc. underneath them. You cannot put a fork in , in a lot of places without hearing the dread, 'Clunk' as you hit something solid.

Also there is a largish area, covered now in Bamboo, where there is a layer of about 18 inches of top soil over a solidish concrete surface. The Bamboo may now have put its roots through cracks and in to the whatever is underneath.

 

Help Identify Plant?

Posted: 18/10/2013 at 17:54

It is only toxic if you eat it.

In fact the very young stems of P. esculenta were eaten, cooked like Asparagus.

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/consumer/poison/Phytoam.htm

I like the plant myself, we have a few dotted around, but we do not have anyone visiting who is daft enough to eat the berries.

 

Warning!

Posted: 18/10/2013 at 15:39

Be careful with Nigella too, amazing what Love in a mist brings up.

Now you know why proper Botanical names are so  important!

Lycoris americana  shares the same name as Colchitum too!

Bramley Apple Tree

Posted: 17/10/2013 at 21:00

Well, we do have three freezers, but mostly our apples go into store. They usually last until April, depending on the severity of the winter and the ingress of rodents.

There is no point making Cider or Apple wine, sadly I am allergic to alcohol so never drink the stuff.

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