Berghill


Latest posts by Berghill

Feeding

Posted: 03/12/2014 at 12:38

Ashwoods recommend feeding in September with a Seaweed based fertiliser.

Paeonia delavayi

Posted: 02/12/2014 at 10:40

lutea means yellow.

There are forms of P. delavayi where the stamens etc. in the centre are more yellow in colour than others. You would need to buy one in flower.

The pure yellow one is also known as Paeonia lutea var. ludlowii

Have a look at Kelways website.

Tulbaghia - wow!

Posted: 25/11/2014 at 14:40

They have a wonderful display of them at Bodnant Gardens. Tried them from seeds, but never managed to overwinter the plants. I think that established ones need to be kept dry and frost free over winter.

There are between 26 and 29 species listed. South African in origin.

Primula Auricula

Posted: 24/11/2014 at 08:59

Worth taking a look at the Auricula and Primula Society pages.

http://www.auriculaandprimula.org.uk/

Primula Auricula

Posted: 23/11/2014 at 11:56

These are some of the ones from the Theatre


 


 


 

Primula Auricula

Posted: 23/11/2014 at 10:45

No problems, it is on a South east facing wall. Do have a shade netting if the sun ever shines too much though.

 

Primula Auricula

Posted: 23/11/2014 at 09:12

This is where I grow mine, in Summer. In winter they are moved to the cold greenhouse.


 

House moving and needing plant advice

Posted: 21/11/2014 at 09:04

Important to remember that you must specifically exclude any plants form the sale and make sure the purchasers know it. Plants in the soil belong to the property and as such removing them without excluding them is illegal.

Do Bramleys get bitter pit?

Posted: 19/11/2014 at 20:33

You can spray the blossom with Calcium as well, or just spread lime on the soil round the tree. I did the Calcium thing as there are plants under our trees which are not that fond of lime.

 

Do Bramleys get bitter pit?

Posted: 19/11/2014 at 15:23

The top image is Scab, one of the most common Apple fungus and a bad year for it this year it has been too.

Yes, that is Bitter pit and Bramleys are rather prone to it. It is caused by a Calcium deficiency. Often weather related when the calcium in the soil becomes unavailable because of extreme drought or leached out by extreme rainfall.

We find they are not edible when afflicted by Bitter pit.

I treated ours by  making deep holes around the tree with a crow bar and filling them with a Calcium solution. It seemed to work.

Discussions started by Berghill

The Bee Border

 
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The mole hole to end all moleholes

 
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Olearia pruning

 
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Alpines for All

 
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Slup pellets

 
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Iris sibirica

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Fascinating discovery

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How very frustrating.......

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More work!

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Silly question of the day!

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Ptilostemon afer

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Bearded Iris

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Bloooo...badger

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Nectaroscordum siculum

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Chlorotic leaves

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1 to 15 of 42 threads