Berghill


Latest posts by Berghill

Help Identifying Please...

Posted: 26/04/2015 at 12:33

Linaria purpurea comes to mind.

Garden Pictures 2015

Posted: 24/04/2015 at 17:51

Had a nice surprise today, was offered this aerial shot of the garden. Our property is the one on the right hand side of the image. And as, the Boss says, no washing out for once.


 

Clematis Montana Wilt

Posted: 24/04/2015 at 08:47

Molluscs do tend to rasp away at the stems and can devastate even an established Clematis. One of ours was damaged by the cat using it as a claw sharpening post.

One thing though is that it definitely is NOT Honey fungus. The yellow stuff is the sap from the Clematis itself. You would see a lot of other problems if it was Honey fungus.

 

Clematis Montana Wilt

Posted: 23/04/2015 at 16:01

Sounds more like mechanical damage than anything else. Something has damaged the stem at the base, either molluscs, or lawn mower or some such thing. The stem then leaks sap and dies back to the point of damage. They usually shoot from below the damage if they were planted deeply enough in the first place. Takes a while to get back to full size though.

wood Anenome

Posted: 21/04/2015 at 20:50

Seed is easy, as long as you take it when it is still green, but comes off the plant easily. Sow immediately and keep cool, shady and moist and germination is in Spring.

Or, in September furtle round in the soil where the plants are growing and dig up some of the roots and replant them where you want more of them.

Please help me identify this plant

Posted: 21/04/2015 at 12:37

Hellebore looks rather like H. foetidus. Easy enough to tell, crush a leaf! If it stinks then it is foetidus

collecting ranunculus seeds?

Posted: 21/04/2015 at 10:38

The seed once sown does not need to be kept indoors. I put mine in a protected, shady spot outside over winter. Keep them watered though, if it goes dry. They should germinate in Spring,

Whats are these yellow beauties?

Posted: 21/04/2015 at 10:31

and Mahonia. Lots of forms of this.

Whats are these yellow beauties?

Posted: 21/04/2015 at 08:45

Pictures?

Doubt very much if one is a Daphne, unless you are very very lucky. The yellow flowering Daphne do not normally survive too well outdoors in Britain.

I'm not sure what they are?

Posted: 20/04/2015 at 20:33

Sound like one of the mining bees. They do not normally sting. Leave them alone and they will soon disappear, once they have laid an egg and filled the hole with pollen for the developing grub.

Discussions started by Berghill

Two shrubs for id

 
Replies: 3    Views: 183
Last Post: 13/06/2017 at 20:34

A Few May Flowers

 
Replies: 9    Views: 312
Last Post: 24/05/2017 at 18:27

Liverwort on seed pots

 
Replies: 6    Views: 181
Last Post: 19/05/2017 at 20:45

Shrub id

 
Replies: 3    Views: 209
Last Post: 05/05/2017 at 20:55

Barnardia numidica

 
Replies: 0    Views: 107
Last Post: 16/03/2017 at 11:17

Oemleria cerasiformis

 
Replies: 5    Views: 230
Last Post: 15/03/2017 at 20:35

Hellebores

 
Replies: 7    Views: 619
Last Post: 14/01/2017 at 20:50

Monty Don and Potting compost

Replies: 30    Views: 2062
Last Post: 26/10/2016 at 17:05

The Bee Border

 
Replies: 22    Views: 1673
Last Post: 14/08/2016 at 17:31

The mole hole to end all moleholes

 
Replies: 7    Views: 568
Last Post: 17/07/2016 at 16:16

Olearia pruning

 
Replies: 0    Views: 394
Last Post: 05/07/2016 at 08:57

Alpines for All

 
Replies: 5    Views: 648
Last Post: 16/06/2016 at 17:27

Slup pellets

 
Replies: 13    Views: 1193
Last Post: 09/06/2016 at 20:26

Iris sibirica

Replies: 8    Views: 985
Last Post: 19/06/2016 at 11:46

Fascinating discovery

Replies: 14    Views: 1913
Last Post: 08/12/2015 at 18:19
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