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blairs


Latest posts by blairs

exotic looking plant ideas please

Posted: 16/01/2014 at 12:32

"then there is a large raised bed to be used for succulents, any ideas please"

Agave americana are hardy but only in free draining soil - think 80% grit and perlite to loose soil. Agave americana marginata and Agave americana medio-picta alba and Agave americana medio-picta aurea look great. I have them.

exotic looking plant ideas please

Posted: 16/01/2014 at 12:23

Some of the above but Pseudopanax is not that hardy (-5 at most) so I would not plant in County Durham. The one with the large leaf look is Tetrapanax 'T-Rex' which has leaves over 1 metre. It is hardy, though deciduous after -3C. It bounced back in spring. Fully hardy where you live.

Rheum, Gunnera manicata, giant butterbur are all jungle giants.
Look out for Fatsia taiwania (polycarpa 'needham form'). Far more elegant than bog standard Fatsia. Fatsia moseri is the larger leaf variety, so adds to the exotic look quickly over the species one.

The hardy schefflera are also worthy of any garden and add to the look. Schefflera taiwana rhoddidenrioflora is half-hardy in shelter, possibly lower.

Cordylines are also a necessary.

Bananas - musa basjoo is hardy if protected. Ensete's are hardy if you overwinter frost free.

Trachycarpus winsan and Trachycarpus wagnerianus are the hardiest of the palms.

I agree on Ferns - Dicksonia Antarctica have massive fronds.

Begonia like imperialis, dahlia imperialis etc are all good.

Basically grouping hardy, half hardy and sub-tropical specimen plants will give the look and not the hassle.

cordyline austrailis

Posted: 16/01/2014 at 09:42

It naturally splits into multi-heads after about 6-10ft. It then starts to looks more like a palm tree. So just leave it and it will naturally do the needful when older.

Can anyone identify these worms?

Posted: 15/01/2014 at 17:16

I would clean the pot with hot soapy water mixed with a dollop of bleach to keep things clean for your herbs. What are you thinking?

Neighbours not wildlife friendly

Posted: 15/01/2014 at 11:39

Am half way between the two. I leave wildlife alone (Toads, frogs, beetles, birds) but do not go out my way to make a wildlife garden as it is my space after all. If non destructive wildlife thrive, then great. Some birds have nested in a hedge and I leave that wild for them in spring to autumn. Balance is the word.

don't waste my time plant!

Posted: 13/01/2014 at 18:25

My problem is I hate throwing good plants away. My neighbours have lots of my plants (some additional windbreaks  ). I want to move/bin some larger Lavender as well. It does little and takes up space. I can never smell it in summer unless I stand on it.

Lawn revival got me thinking

Posted: 13/01/2014 at 18:20

Regular cutting should rid the lawn of weeds - apart from low growing ones like clover. My front lawn, which is north facing is Ok looking, if with a yellow tinge. I try to keep off it in winter.

Back lawn, full sun even in winter has moss this year and that is after raking, aeration, backfilling with sand and top dressing. I also keep it longer to make it look greener and to hide that it is not flat at all.

I use weed and feed which helps keep weeds away, though not moss it seems.

Everedge steel lawn edging?

Posted: 12/01/2014 at 22:09
* Red Dahlia * wrote (see)

Do you sink it or leave level, what if you run off edge and mover blades hit it, ouch!

My mower had hit my wooden sunken edging and it took a chink out of it and bent the blade causing it to gauge the lawn.

I liek the idea of the metal edging as pointed out it works with curves. I have seen a very similar edging used in my local park and it seems to work a treat and that is with council workers.

Growing grass and shrubs in the shade

Posted: 12/01/2014 at 20:24

Right plant for right place. Grass needs light so why bother trying to grow something that plainly does not want to grow there? Half m front garden is in full shade and I have given up trying to grow grass there as it is too dark for it to grow right.

Try shade loving plants like Mahonia, Aucuba japonica, Jabobs ladder, majority of Ferns, Brunnera etc.

cleaning a greenhouse

Posted: 11/01/2014 at 23:24

I just use bleach once per year (September or spring) inside. I do wash the glass (perspex for me) whenever it needs it. Sulpher candle works if you have had problems. You need to remove everything from the GH first.

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