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Bob Bob


Latest posts by Bob Bob

1 to 10 of 15

Cutting back aquilegia

Posted: 14/06/2014 at 12:44

Right - I did cut them right back last year towards the autumn and noticed the fresh foliage underneath that Bookertoo mentions.

I'll cut back a bit earlier this year and let that fresh foliage come through. I'll leave a few seed heads on a couple of them as well and see where they seed themselves.

Cutting back aquilegia

Posted: 12/06/2014 at 19:25

I have a few clumps of Aquilegia dotted about my borders and although it's very good in early spring with plenty of flowers I've not been able to get it to do much afterwards.

I've kept deadheading it in the past but it doesn't really seem to prolong it's flowering period by much. Is it worth cutting it back hard in the hope of a second flowering later in the season or is it just going to give me one show either way?

Talkback: Growing Russian vine

Posted: 10/06/2014 at 17:08

Another concern about using a Russian Vine as cover is that it's deciduous. Depending on the length of the site you wish to cover then it might be worth looking at evergreen shrubs in however many pots/troughs you need lined up against the fence.

Euonymus or Aucube, while not spectacular, will give thick cover all year round. And if you don't mind tying in then I have seen periwinkle used as wall cover. They're all tough evergreen plants that don't need mollycoddling.

Talkback: Growing Russian vine

Posted: 10/06/2014 at 15:57

It'll be alright in a pot Gerry. The only thing to worry about is that it grows fast and left unchecked for a long period it can cause problems.

Since yours is in a pot (which I'm hoping is on solid ground and not soil) then it will be OK. Have a look where it's heading every couple of weeks and give it a cutting back when it's heading off where you don't want it. Don't be tempted to let it grow somewhere which would be difficult for you to access - then the tempation to leave it for another day or week kicks in and before you know it months have gone by and it becomes a major job.

Keep the occasional eye on it, cut back when needed and it will be fine - It's a plant, not an evil genius!

Snapped lily - Will it grow?

Posted: 09/06/2014 at 21:33

I'm afraid not.

Could be worse - I had around 20 of them snapped last year by builders replacing the neighbors fence. Between accidents like that (I've snapped a few myself!) and lily beetles I'm seriously reconsidering their place in the garden.

Border planting plans, suggestions

Posted: 09/06/2014 at 21:12

Next time your down the shops have a quick flick through the gardening mags - one or two of them usually have a few border designs telling you what's what, where it'll grow and very often suggest alternatives.

My approach has been to let my borders evolve as I've learned - it's taking a few years and it's not finished by any means but that for me is part of gardening. Like a lot of people I started off with an empty garden and ran around a garden centre picking up whatever looked nice and then throwing it all in. It's only with time that I'm developing a sense of structure and theme and learning what works in my garden. There's very little in my borders which hasn't at sometime been dug up and moved about and there's quite a bit that's been dug up and replaced.

If you like red & white then I'd definitely suggest some Dogwood for structure - I don't think there's a better sight in the winter than bright red stems sticking out of the snow.

 

 

Sweetpeas

Posted: 09/06/2014 at 17:58

I've grew them in two different places in my garden over the last few years and had good results either way.

I've had them in full afternoon sun up against a fence in a pretty shallow planter (around 6 inches which is too shallow really) - I gave them (when I remembered!) a good soak every week or every couple of days in very hot weather and a feed every fortnight with whatever was to hand (either tomato feed or fish blood/bone) and come the height of summer you could not see the fence for blooms.

They did yellow off and die a little quicker than I'd have liked - My less than attentive watering/feeding regime combined with baking in a plastic planter in tired compost probably did that!

I've also grown them in the ground in a part of the garden which only gets morning sun and is in shade the rest of the day. These also put on a good show. Not quite as profuse but they lasted longer and looked that bit lusher - I'm guessing the better nutrients in the soil, more depth for roots and water retention compensated for less sunlight.

Somewhere between the two should give great results - plenty of depth, food, water and a good bit of sun - I think a spot that avoids the midday sun would be fine, especially in a container. Any half decent compost should do the job so long as you keep a regular feeding routine.

 

 

Plant ID Please

Posted: 08/06/2014 at 20:47

I had a feeling that's what it was but figured I'd ask the people who know what it is!

Thanks for the answers. I had violas in the front garden around 3 years ago but never in the back. I'm guessing some seed had a lift via the dog's snout

I'll definitely encourage it. I'll collect a pod or two and let the rest self seed - nature invariably makes better choices on where to place plants than me.

Plant ID Please

Posted: 08/06/2014 at 20:10

Doing a little bit of weeding and planting this afternoon and came across this little charmer hiding amongst it all.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48597.jpg?width=265&height=350&mode=max

 

Any ideas?

Thanks.

 

seeds

Posted: 04/06/2014 at 20:29

Foxgloves are especially easy. I've got loads of white/pink ones I started from seed last year - I've been giving them away I've grown that many!

Here's what I did....

1 - Got the seed in late summer and sowed very thinly (it's tiny seed) into an old long vertical planter. I didn't even bother putting fresh compost or anything in there - just whatever was in there.

2 - Put the planter somewhere out of site in a shady corner of the garden

3 - Forgot about it till late March, then picked out the best looking ones and potted them on. Just left them in the same out of sight corner.

4 - Early May I planted them in the final location in the ground. If you leave some in their pots for a bit longer it seems to hold them back and you can then stagger planting for a longer display.

 

 

 

1 to 10 of 15

Discussions started by Bob Bob

Cutting back aquilegia

Replies: 7    Views: 807
Last Post: 14/06/2014 at 15:03

Plant ID Please

Replies: 5    Views: 235
Last Post: 08/06/2014 at 20:50
2 threads returned