London (change)
Today 18°C / 15°C
Tomorrow 20°C / 15°C

BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Blood Fish and Bone

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 18:37

About £20 for 25kg online (if you have room in the shed!)

LEYLANDII HEDGE REMOVAL

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 15:36

Freshford, you could always just erect another fence right next to the neighbours rickety one, but just inside your boundary.

Camera Corner

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 14:41

Took these yesterday of the first signs of life in the two new raised beds I built last autumn.  There are about half a dozen crocus varieties and about the same in mini-daffs, some of which aren't showing yet: 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/38139.jpg?width=350

 

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/38138.jpg?width=350

and some crocus in half of an old recycled water butt outside the shed in the back garden:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/38140.jpg?width=350

Damaged water butt

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 14:12

Also, a repair done on the inside will be infinitely better than one done to the outside because the water pressure will push against the inner repair 'patch' and actually help seal it, whereas one done on the outside will have to fight against the pressure so will completely rely on the 'stickiness' of the substance used to effect the repair.  More difficult to apply though unless you (or a little helper) can squeeze inside to do it.  Trillium is right about cleanliness - whatever you try, empty and clean the butt before allowing it to dry in a shed etc for a few days.  Any dampness in the crack area will ruin any attempted repair.

ID Please

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 13:05

Hi Alan, I've run it through some free software (Irfanview) and auto-adjusted the colours to try and make it a bit clearer:

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/38123.jpg?width=518&height=350&mode=max

Could it be an olive?  If not, then I agree with Dove - a willow of some kind.  If you didn't add the support Alan, then it must be something bought in rather than blown-in!

Need plant I-D please.

Posted: 22/02/2014 at 17:51

The finely leaved one coming up everywhere looks like self-seeded love-in-a-mist (Nigella.)  You can ust pull it up from where you don't want it, but it's a very attractive cottage-garden annual.

Top soil

Posted: 22/02/2014 at 11:57

Hi Barbara, yes, it's best to do it now before you start planting.  If you can lay your hands on (not literally of course!) some well-rotted manure and dig this in well to the topsoil it will provide many years of nutrients for your plants.  You can even buy this ready bagged from garden centres and online these days.  If you can't find any, then get some fish, blood and bone fertilizer and fork this in using the dosage recommended on the packet.  That also lasts a long time but you will need to sprinkle a bit over the top of the soil each spring to keep everything happy (in fact, do that even if you add the manure after the first year as plants in raised beds do tend to use up the available goodness pretty quickly.)  

Attacking pampas

Posted: 22/02/2014 at 11:49

That location sounds great, Sue!  It will provide excellent cover for any wildlife visiting the pond (not many predators will venture into it due to the sharp edges of the blades) and it will provide some shade which should help keep algae levels down in the pond.

GardenIng jokes

Posted: 22/02/2014 at 10:52

What do you call a lady horse race enthusiast who is still wearing her Ascot flower covered hat at Christmas?

A seed head!  

Attacking pampas

Posted: 22/02/2014 at 10:14

Hi Sue, you don't need to do much to them while they're young other than removing any of the outer 'blades' when they begin to die or look untidy, and the old flowering stems in the spring.  If you have a large garden then they can look great when they reach full size (often 6 feet or more across at the base) but can overwhelm a small garden and are really tricky to remove once they reach a metre diameter at the base.  I had to remove one of that size about 5 years ago (using a chainsaw) and the 'stump' is still there, but (very) slowly rotting underneath the clematis I grew over it to hide it.. 

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Anyone for squirrel crumble?

Thieving rodents 
Replies: 5    Views: 190
Last Post: 25/10/2014 at 22:29

Plant ID quizzes

Have fun identifying plants! 
Replies: 16    Views: 379
Last Post: 14/09/2014 at 13:17

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
Replies: 13    Views: 342
Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 201
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 186
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 506
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 317
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 710
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 415
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 487
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 248
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 545
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 561
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 48    Views: 4299
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 19:57

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 1733
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33
1 to 15 of 25 threads