BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Apple Trees - Hopeless Cases?

Posted: 27/08/2014 at 18:54

If there's not even any blossom, try a feed of super phosphate in early Spring.  If that doesn't spur them into flowering (pun intended!) then not much will!

what is this?

Posted: 27/08/2014 at 18:48

Forget-me-nots.  You could call them a weed but they are easy to pull-up.  I leave mine until the summer then yank them out.

Crocuses

Posted: 26/08/2014 at 00:17

Many of them aren't as reliable as one would wish.

Crocuses

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 22:58

They do well in planters.  This taken in early March this year:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/57558.jpg?width=288&height=350&mode=max

How many will come up again next year is a good question though!

I think I'll order another mixture and plant them anyway - can't have too many but if only a few of the ones I planted last autumn reappear it'll be a disappointment and also be too late to do anything about it.

Black Spot

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 19:32

I'm grafting onto the existing roses (the ones which always get blackspot) near the base, so will cut off the existing rose after the grafts (hopefully!) get going.  A wild rose rootstock might also be a good choice - I have to dig loads of those up all the time as they grow in the hedge and seed into the borders!  Been chucking it down since midday here mate and doesn't look like it's going to stop until the same time tomorrow!

Black Spot

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 16:35

Hi Alan, I'm going to try T-bud grafting, as you get more material from the donor plant.  Here are some links with drawings which show it better than photos tend to do:

http://derrosenmeister.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/own-root-or-grafted-whats-rosarian-to.html

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-to-graft-rose-plants.html

 

 

Black Spot

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 15:29

I've been very lucky this year as I bought 4 red roses of various types from Wilko for next to nothing and one has turned out to be completely resistant to black spot - it's the only rose in my garden that isn't an absolute mess.  I'm going to try grafting it onto ALL of the other rose bushes and any bushes that fail to take the graft are coming out - it's far too much hassle to keep spraying them which only seems to keep it at bay slightly here.  I no longer see the flowers when I look at them, just the ghastly foliage, so it's "shape up or ship out" I'm afraid!

Feeding a cherry tree

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 15:20

If they fall while still tiny, that's almost certainly lack[ of pollination.  I have the same problems with fruit and wildlife.  Woodpigeons eat the cherries while they are still green and the only defence is to net the trees but that doesn't generally work against squirrels, unfortunately.   Some report a pet cat or jack terrier is a good squirrel deterrent but SWMBO says "no more pets!" so that's no option here! 

Feeding a cherry tree

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 14:09

Hi c&c, 'Maynard' is listed as a self-fertile variety but as cherries tend to flower very early in the year, there are often few pollinating insects about so hand-pollinating is a good idea.  In fact, I do that with all of my fruit trees as most are dwarf.  It only costs a bit of time.

All fruit trees need a feed and a few handfuls of fish, blood and bone sprinkled and tickled into the soil in early Spring is all they need.  Sprinkle the feed over an area of about a metre diameter around the tree and keep that area free of grass and other plants as these will compete with the feeding roots of the tree (which are close to the surface.)  A mulch with compost or well-rotted farmyard manure is also a good idea but don't let that touch the trunk as it can cause problems if it is piled up against it.

As an aside, even self-pollinating fruit trees will crop better if there is another variety in the vicinity, so a getting different cherry but in the same pollination group (Maynard is B) may well help if you have the space for a second tree.

Stacey & her chilli bits

Posted: 25/08/2014 at 13:19

You can also dry them on the plant as long as they are indoors.  Simply stop watering them once they have turned ripe. 

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Plant ID quizzes

Have fun identifying plants! 
Replies: 16    Views: 327
Last Post: 14/09/2014 at 13:17

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
Replies: 13    Views: 307
Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 169
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 157
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 473
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 283
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 544
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 365
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 446
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 213
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 520
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 527
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 48    Views: 3865
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 19:57

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 1619
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 485
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21
1 to 15 of 24 threads