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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Magnolia

Posted: 15/06/2013 at 10:59

Hi Jeannieb, pot-grown trees can be planted out at any time of the year.  The main thing is to keep watering it (at least once a week) for the rest of this year until it goes dormant.

Copper sulphate

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 23:21

It was withdrawn from sale for garden use in November 2011.  Here's a link to the RHS advice on which chemicals are now illegal, and includes available alternatives:

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/Profile.aspx?pid=820

RHS fact sheet (march 2013) on garden fungicides:

http://www.rhs.org.uk/Media/PDFs/Advice/Fungicides

Posts been stopped?

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 22:35

They may have accidentally clicked 'Ignore' on one of your posts, Paula.  It's easy to do when the cursor passes over your avatar and the black box pops-up with "Message" and "Ignore".  If they have done that, they won't be able to see any of your posts.  They can fix it by going into 'Settings', then 'Forum settings' and 'Members I am ignoring'.  Then they need to remove your name from the list.  Some folk even accidentally do it to themselves which can be quite confusing for them!

Good Evening FORKERS

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 22:15

Evening all, checked my garden over after the strong gusty winds and found a few casualties.  The worst was that the top 1/3rd of my 'Lizzie' plum had broken off.

Tidied up the break with sharp secateurs.  Luckily it's only a few years old and is silver-leaf resistant so should recover.  Also some tall Oxeye daises had blown over - I always forget to stake those (ps, has anyone tried the Chelsea chop on those?)  Luckily I had already staked the delphiniums which are growing magnificently and just about to flower - can't wait. 

Bromophos

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 22:01

If the problem is cabbage root fly (for which bromophos was usually recommended), the methods now recommended are root collars (which you can make yourself) and/or covering the brassicas with enviromesh, which is what I prefer as it prevents cabbage root fly, cabbage white butterfly and the biggest pest (literally) in my area, bloomin great big fat woodpigeons!

Aquelegia

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 19:05

Most of my clay stays quite damp and contains a lot of organic stuff added over the years.  I think they do need damp soil in general.

Aquelegia

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 18:15

I have clay soil and the ones I grow from seed in compost only start growing well when planted out into the clay, so you might like to try something a bit heavier in the pots, like John Innes No3.  Like nutcutlet, I love breeding them and also weed out the muddy colours and small flowered ones before they get much chance to cross-pollinate with the 'keepers'.

Buttercups

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 18:00

Chris, I find they are extremely susceptible to glyphosate, so much so that I spray them in the winter and it kills them.  Unfortunately the seed stays viable for many years, so if they have ever seeded they'll be with you until the cows come home!

Geranium pratense 'Purple Haze'

Posted: 14/06/2013 at 17:55

I grew the same one from T&M a few years ago Andy, but can't remember what it looked like when very young.  The leaves do turn darker as the season progresses though - mine is looking dark green with a hint of dark purple at the moment and has just started flowering.  When self-seeded babies appear, only a few over the years have had purple leaves.  I think only one germinated from the original packet, so at least you are doing better than me on that score.

 

preserving heritage tomatoes

Posted: 13/06/2013 at 23:44

While tomatoes are largely self-fertilising, there is always a possibility of them cross-pollinating if grown close together.  Perhaps you could try growing one plant in a pot placed some distance away from the rest?  This year's fruit will come true to type regardless of any cross-pollination - it's the seed and next year's plants which could be hybrids.

I'm not sure I'd call "Peacevine" a heritage variety though.  As far as I've been able to find out, it was developed by Dr. Alan Kapuler who is still going strong I believe.  Interesting man from what I've read.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
Replies: 13    Views: 276
Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 138
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 127
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 438
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 247
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 488
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 328
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 396
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 193
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 490
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 501
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 48    Views: 3517
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 19:57

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 1440
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 457
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1629
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16
1 to 15 of 23 threads