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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

What am I?

Posted: 09/09/2014 at 20:12
nutcutlet wrote (see)

I fear that's HF. But any fungus growing out of a live tree is not good news in the long term

 My thoughts exactly, nut.  Sorry it's such bad news Heather.

Oak tree problems

Posted: 09/09/2014 at 15:59

The issue with chestnut trees is another invader, this time a leaf miner:

http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/learn/threats-to-our-woodland/pests-and-diseases/horse-chestnut-leaf-miner/?gclid=CKfc5vax1MACFRHHtAoduDgAig

Fortunately, it only causes leaf disfigurement and early leaf fall.  At this point in time it is thought not to affect the long term health of the trees.

 

Sieving soil - compaction?

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 22:03

As long as you are adding organic matter, worms will thrive keeping the soil aerated (plant roots need air as well as water and nutrients) and the soil will look after itself.  Mulching the surface with composted manure will allow as natural a cycle as is possible with cultivated soil.  Nature does perfectly well without our help but when we cultivate crops, we must add back the nutrients which we remove in the form of crops and the best known way of doing that is by mulching with compost and manure.  Worms pull the organic matter back down into the soil and digest it.  The worm casts they produce are considered the perfect plant food.

Sub-soil nasties?

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 19:26

Fungi are one of the few living things which can break down woody matter (mainly cellulose) into a form which plants can re-use.  They are an essential part of the cycle of life.  If all fungi died-off right now, life would quite soon come to an end on the land (it would probably continue in the sea though.)

The parts we usually see (mushrooms or toadstools) are just the fruiting body and only a tiny part of the main fungus, which is known as mycelium and lives in the soil or inside other living things (for those species which are parasitic.)

If toadstools are a nuisance on a lawn you can just sweep them off with a stiff brush - the main body of the fungus won't be killed by doing that.

A tiny plant ID, and a quick question about roses.

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 19:12

Some of the miniature roses sold have more than one plant per pot - my OH was gifted an 'indoor' rose which had 3 separate bushes in the pot.

Fungi - but what kind

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 16:03

What a wonderful and enchanting scene!

Fungi are our friends and essential to life on this planet.  Inkcap, as Edd says, which are common on ground covered with bark chippings.  Enjoy the view as they will be gone almost as quickly as they came - like the name suggests, they 'melt' into a dark liquid resembling ink.

Chillis on Thai basil

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 14:47

Thai basil is very pungent and has a noticeable scent of liquorice when a leaf is very gently rubbed between fingers.  Lovely stuff - here's a pic of one of mine (the one in the centre):

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/58984.jpg?width=288&height=350&mode=max

I think Dove has ID'd your chilli.

Sub-soil nasties?

Posted: 08/09/2014 at 14:33

The vast, vast majority of fungi are entirely beneficial and many are in fact essential, so nothing to worry about.

Wisteria are hungry and thirsty plants so you will need to prepare quite a large and deep hole then mix lots of well-rotted farmyard manure (which you can buy in bags from garden centres these days) and compost with the soil before planting, as the soil under the slabs will very likely be in poor condition.  This will give your wisteria a flying start and feed it for several years before you need to start additional feeding.

It's my birthday

Posted: 07/09/2014 at 15:02

Happy birthday mate!

A Sheddy Question!

Posted: 06/09/2014 at 20:57

There's no single answer to that - depends on the weight being supported and the type of ground you have.  Digging a 15cm foundation and filling with hardcore as a base (and then compacted), with a 15cm layer of concrete on top of that would be more than sufficient for such a slab supporting a single story wood and glass structure I would think.  That's what I used as a foundation for my conservatory.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Anyone for squirrel crumble?

Thieving rodents 
Replies: 5    Views: 240
Last Post: 25/10/2014 at 22:29

Plant ID quizzes

Have fun identifying plants! 
Replies: 16    Views: 407
Last Post: 14/09/2014 at 13:17

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
Replies: 13    Views: 360
Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 229
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 206
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 527
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 358
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 830
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 456
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 511
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 264
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 568
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 589
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 48    Views: 4645
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 19:57

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 1824
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33
1 to 15 of 25 threads