BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

greenhouse's

Posted: 02/10/2016 at 12:31

Many will supply a base (often called a plinth) and the stronger makes of GH such as Rhino can be erected directly on firm soil if such a base is used.  Like Frank says, changing the soil in a GH border does become a bit of a chore though.  I dug mine out after about a few years and lined the trenches with a strong landscape fabric then filled it with multi-purpose compost which makes things a bit easier when changing the soil (which needs doing annually or at least every couple of years.)  The main advantage with GH soil borders is that much less watering is needed than when growing in pots but things like tomatoes will send roots out of the bottom of the pot into a layer of gravel which works well as Frank again mentions.

help with a difficult border

Posted: 02/10/2016 at 12:08

Clematis, ferns and heuchera for me.  All of those are happy in shade and the latter will give year round colour.

Grubs

Posted: 02/10/2016 at 12:04

Does it look anything like this ladybird pupal case?


http://www.mywildlifefriendlygarden.com/Images/Insects/2013-07-06%20harlequin%20larva.JPG

Last edited: 02 October 2016 12:04:39

Spent summer tub soil, what to do next?

Posted: 01/10/2016 at 16:09

Yes, my used MP compost goes onto the borders and veg plot.  While it has no nutrient value it makes an excellent soil conditioner.  There have been a few recent threads about this and most folk do the same.

Spent summer tub soil, what to do next?

Posted: 01/10/2016 at 15:50

It depends on what the 'soil' in the tub is Tina.  If it is garden soil or a John Innes compost then you can just add some fertiliser.  If it is a general multi-purpose compost then best replaced but if you are only growing pansies or other winter bedding etc then you could try doing that and replace the whole lot in the spring.  Alternatively, scrape off the top few inches and replace with fresh compost.

Plant ID

Posted: 30/09/2016 at 17:16

Do you work for the Guernsey tourist board GD?  If not, you should, as I would certainly love to visit after seeing so many beautiful plants in your various ID threads!

what are these?

Posted: 30/09/2016 at 17:11

I agree, the berry clusters are typical of black briony although it would be nice to see a full leaf (which are heart shaped.)

Anyone done any gardening today - version 3

Posted: 30/09/2016 at 15:03

Spent half of yesterday and all of today so far ripping out everything in the front half of my front garden, which is one large raised bed.  I thought I'd done the hard bit in removing a 20 year old yucca which I grew from seed but has gone past its best.  The 'heart' was huge but discovered it sliced up rather easily with a sharp spade and later an axe for feeding into the shredder (the leaves are a different kettle of fish though and seem designed to be the perfect shredder-jammer-upper!)


However, the yucca wasn't the worst problem.  Couch grass has sneakily infested the whole area and the roots have been an absolute bu**er to remove.  That also means removing and isolating the few plants  I want to keep (a couple of hardy geraniums including Rozanne and a rather nice Japanese quince) in pots for a few months to ensure no couch grass came in entwined around their roots.  Back out for another shift after finishing this cuppa!

Corn on the Cob

Posted: 30/09/2016 at 13:37

Best picked and plunged straight into boiling water.  As soon as you pick them, the sugars start turning into starch and so the cobs become less sweet.  If you can't eat them all before they go over, they do freeze extremely well.  I had a huge crop several years ago and froze the majority which still tasted great 6 months later.


How to tell when ripe:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHPSntkdpkY

Neglected hawthorne hedge - worth saving?

Posted: 30/09/2016 at 13:32

You could try 'laying' it, which is what farmers do to make hedges livestock-proof.  This will also encourage vigorous new growth:


http://www.woodlands.co.uk/blog/woodland-activities/how-to-lay-a-hedge/


You could perhaps try that and also plant some whips in the gaps to fill it out until nature takes its course.  It might be worth looking for a local hedge laying expert though as I suspect the way they are leaning will make laying it a bit tricky.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

'Dramatic' music in TV programmes

Increase in noise! 
Replies: 37    Views: 1160
Last Post: 23/11/2016 at 22:23

Autumn foliage photos (2016)

Thought I'd start a thread just for our photos 
Replies: 84    Views: 6104
Last Post: 03/12/2016 at 00:32

Gardener's World about to start now!

Replies: 18    Views: 839
Last Post: 14/07/2016 at 16:55

Cutting ID

I thought these were philadelphus 
Replies: 3    Views: 367
Last Post: 11/07/2016 at 17:34

Canary

Hope it finds it's way home 
Replies: 3    Views: 451
Last Post: 26/04/2016 at 18:22

Vine weevils

..ate all of my winter carrots! 
Replies: 8    Views: 1360
Last Post: 01/01/2016 at 22:01

Huge pest problem

Don't think netting will work 
Replies: 10    Views: 983
Last Post: 19/12/2015 at 21:00

Renovate or remove privet hedge?

Replace or cut back hard? 
Replies: 19    Views: 2103
Last Post: 20/09/2015 at 13:33

Drought

No real rain here for weeks 
Replies: 11    Views: 674
Last Post: 07/06/2015 at 18:41

Little Red Devils (Lily beetles)

They're about now! 
Replies: 1    Views: 693
Last Post: 06/04/2015 at 17:03

Christmas has come early

New trees 
Replies: 9    Views: 1311
Last Post: 19/12/2014 at 16:52

Anyone for squirrel crumble?

Thieving rodents 
Replies: 12    Views: 1101
Last Post: 27/11/2014 at 21:12

Plant ID quizzes

Have fun identifying plants! 
Replies: 16    Views: 1145
Last Post: 14/09/2014 at 13:17

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
Replies: 13    Views: 1143
Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 1002
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04
1 to 15 of 36 threads