London (change)
Fri 26°C / 18°C
Tomorrow 28°C / 20°C

BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Gloxinia

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 12:09

Giving advice on ventilation depends on where it's sited, but it is rather low in the container which won't be helping.  You can improve drainage by adding horticultural grit to the soil, so you could help with both things by gently digging the plant up (trying not to damage any roots), then mix enough grit in with the compost in the container so that the soil height is increased to about an inch below the top of the sides.  Then re-plant it and put the slate back on top.  The plant will then get a bit more air.

If you do that, it might be worth removing all of the soil from the container befor you mix in the grit and making sure there are plenty of drainage holes drilled into the bottom - those are absolutely crucial.

 

Gloxinia

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 11:00

Looks like it's suffering from a bit of Botrytis (grey mould.)  I'd remove all dead and dying material and try and improve ventilation and drainage.  High humidity makes it worse.

Garden Gallery 2014

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 10:44

Looks great, OL!  Do I get the feeling your OH's 'golf course' is going to include many more 'hazards' in the future, as parts of it get commandeered for new plants by your good self?

Soil types

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 10:37

Is your soil light and sandy, clay-based or a good loam (ie looks like a John Innes No. 3 compost, if you've ever seen that)?

This forum

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 08:42

I agree, this forum has gone from strength to strength and members are a perfect mix of specialist, expert, experienced, 'weekend' and beginner gardeners.  It's that last word starting in 'g' which is the important one and a general sense of our love of gardening is what comes through on the forum, above all else.

Can I re-vitalise an old lilac tree ?

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 08:23

Yes, you can rejuvenate lilac by cutting back hard and it will grow back.  If it is multi-stemmed, the best way is to remove 1/3rd of the stems (oldest first) right back to the ground each year for 3 years.  As new growth won't flower for 2-3 years, doing that means you will still get some flowers each year.  If it has a single main trunk, you can cut that back to about 6-8 inches from the ground.  New stems will appear, but you won't see any flowers for 2-3 years.  The best time to do it is in early spring, so a bit late to do it this year but you could risk it, especially as you are considering removing it anyway.  When the new stems appear, prune out the weak spindly ones next Spring.  One word of warning though - hard pruning can make lilac throw up lots of suckers in the general area and these can be difficult to deal with.

Sweet Potatoes

Posted: 01/06/2014 at 00:10

Hi Teenrbee, I'm also trying them for the first time this year in a polytunnel.  I have the t&m duo offer - 6 of each type.  Impressive size plugs!  Mine came a couple of weeks ago and have been planted in the polytunnel border - I improved the soil (clay based) by adding lots of MP compost (about 50/50 soil/compost now, down to about 10 inches deep) and also some sharp sand as I read they like sandy soil.  It'll be interesting to compare notes as the season progresses so I'll keep an eye on this thread and may post some photos tomorrow - the plants look as though they are beginning to really take off now.

courgette woes

Posted: 31/05/2014 at 21:34
David K wrote (see)
Steve 309 wrote (see)

Don't slugs live in the soil some of the time?  In which case...

 

Keel slugs live underground all of the time.....feeding mostly on potatoes.

Feeding on my potatoes most of the time I reckon!

hibiscus or rose of sharon

Posted: 31/05/2014 at 21:09

On one of my holidays in Cornwall I saw that particular Hypericum had taken over the whole garden of a hotel I stayed at, Verdun.

courgette woes

Posted: 31/05/2014 at 20:56

Copper isn't perfect when it comes to deterring slugs.  It helps but determined large ones will still cross it if there's a favourite meal on the other side.  And as Steve alludes to, they can always burrow under the soil to get in..

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
Replies: 2    Views: 98
Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 104
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 395
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 186
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 426
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 283
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 336
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 171
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 466
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 479
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 48    Views: 3181
Last Post: 30/06/2014 at 19:57

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 1274
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 426
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1560
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 598
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20
1 to 15 of 22 threads