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Latest posts by BobTheGardener


Posted: 10/11/2015 at 22:25

I agree.  Peel the layers off, one by one and see if you find any small brown/black pupae buried inside which will confirm that it's allium leaf minor rather than leek moth.

Had an attack a couple of years ago about this time of the year but didn't get the problem last year.  Crop rotation and/or covering with fleece from mid September are the only controls.

What on earth is going on with my apple tree.

Posted: 09/11/2015 at 22:26

I think I recently heard that there are approximately ten times more fungi species than there are plant species which makes the mind boggle!  There could be as many as five million!

Don't be scaredy cat.....

Posted: 09/11/2015 at 22:18

Nice one Tootsietim.  I'll go a bit further and say honeysuckle in general.  Mine grow far too quickly, reaching for the sky and leaving a mess of bare stems for the first 6 feet.  When they are cut back they look good for a season but flowers are then few and far between.  I also realised this year that I hardly even noticed the scent either. Coming out!  I can get in two or three more clematis now.

What on earth is going on with my apple tree.

Posted: 09/11/2015 at 22:06

Definitely not Honey fungus Lesley.

The vast majority of fungi found in the garden do only live on dead matter.  In fact, fungi are one of a very few things which break-down woody matter and release the nutrients back into the soil for other plants to use.  They are really gardeners' friends.  The mites will disappear once the tree and fungus (their food source) has gone and are incapable of eating anything else, so no worries there either.

What on earth is going on with my apple tree.

Posted: 09/11/2015 at 20:49

The white jelly-like things are a fungus which is living off the now dead bark.  The tiny insects will be fungus mites which are living off the fungus.

Chilli plants - white specks

Posted: 08/11/2015 at 19:09

Try this, which is often the only way to get rid of a bad pest problem on indoor plants and avoids using potentially harmful pesticides:

  • Pop the pot in a plastic bag and tie the top around the stem.  The idea is to stop any grit and soil from falling out into the water.
  • Fill a bucket with cold water and add a squirt of washing-up liquid.
  • Invert the plant and plunge it into the water, giving it a swish about for a few minutes.

The detergent will break the surface tension of the water and the aphids/thrips etc will drown.  You may have to repeat the process in a week or two if any eggs remained stuck to the leaves and have since hatched.


Advice on a nut tree

Posted: 08/11/2015 at 16:26

Yes but the squirrels get most of them from my tree!  I think I'll plant a purple leaved filbert next time, so I'll at least have the leaves left to admire! 

Advice on a nut tree

Posted: 08/11/2015 at 16:12

I think they are quite fussy primrosecottage and need a sheltered south-facing spot to do well in the UK.  Even then I doubt they would produce much.  Normally grown just for their very pretty blossom in our climate.


Posted: 08/11/2015 at 16:07

Same here Verdun, I declared war on bluebells, muscari and montbretia a few year ago and the garden looks much better for it.  Montbretia in partcicular seems to suck all life out of the soil and nothing else will grow near it.  Bluebell leaves seem to last forever and are just so messy after flowering, especially the large Spanish ones.

What is safe to plant over a ground source heat loop?

Posted: 08/11/2015 at 15:52

As a technical person, I think that makes a lot of sense pansyface.

I did a bit of googling and came up with this though (from a supplier of such systems) which indicates anything can be planted:

So read the small print;  If the guarantee mentions no planting above the loop then stick to lawn, otherwise I wouldn't worry too much.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Renovate or remove privet hedge?

Replace or cut back hard? 
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Last Post: 20/09/2015 at 13:33


No real rain here for weeks 
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Little Red Devils (Lily beetles)

They're about now! 
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Christmas has come early

New trees 
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Anyone for squirrel crumble?

Thieving rodents 
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Last Post: 27/11/2014 at 21:12

Plant ID quizzes

Have fun identifying plants! 
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Last Post: 14/09/2014 at 13:17

Watering dried-out pots

Tip to help to stop water running straight through 
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Last Post: 28/07/2014 at 12:28

Blackfly - ladybirds to the rescue!

Broad bean tip blackfly infestation 
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Last Post: 13/07/2014 at 18:04

Bob's guide to picking soft fruit

Only fto be read by your household's main gardener! 
Replies: 3    Views: 455
Last Post: 05/07/2014 at 18:52

Lovely surprise

I went down the garden in the gloom.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 786
Last Post: 18/06/2014 at 14:32

Dragonfly/Darter/Mayfly ID?

Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
Replies: 6    Views: 694
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 21:44

A week of rain = jungle garden!

It's been too wet to really do anything outside.. 
Replies: 16    Views: 1175
Last Post: 01/06/2014 at 17:42

Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

Replies: 4    Views: 833
Last Post: 24/04/2014 at 11:30

Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

Look for distorted and damaged leaves near the tips 
Replies: 10    Views: 1294
Last Post: 22/04/2014 at 10:58

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 506
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39
1 to 15 of 29 threads