London (change)
Today 13°C / 8°C
Tomorrow 12°C / 9°C

BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Plant biology.

Posted: 14/04/2014 at 07:05

Evolution and numbers, Mike.  A typical plant will produce about a billion pollen grains.  Many plants, while being capable of being pollinated by many different insects, have evolved to use one or two pollinating species in particular which they attract in a wide number of ways (eg by mimicking insect mating hormones);  This makes it more likely that a "preferred" pollinator is more likely to visit another plant of the same species and thus transfer the pollen.

The downside is that these interactions are so complex that the humble human race is unlikely to ever be able to collate all of the information, so we will continue to only find out when our activity leads to the extinction of yet another species.  A good example of this complexity is the Brazil nut, which was studied for decades (possibly over a hundred years) before it was understood:

http://thebrazilnutstory.wordpress.com/pollination/

 

what sort of a tree was that ?

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 20:33

I agree, almost certainly a cherry.  If you can get near enough to smell the blossom, cherries hardly ever have a noticeable scent but plums usually do smell 'flowery'.

More Plant ID please

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 16:19

I agree with Dove.  If you absolutely must move it before the Autumn, then wait until it has flowered and snip off the dead flower heads.  Then transplant as in Dove's advice and water it every day for a week or two, then once a week (even if it has rained) until it dies back in the Autumn.  It will probably sulk though and not produce flowers for a couple of years.

Courgette

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 16:10

Better to start them inside, OL.  They don't like the low temperatures at night in a cold GH.  A sunny windowsill indoors is perfect.

Courgette

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 14:21

Hi LL, I start mine off in 7cm pots and transfer to 15cm which is big enough to keep them in until you plant out.  When there is a lot of leaf area, you do need to keep up with the watering as they dry out fast!

More Plant ID please

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 12:34

The first one is a peony - looking at yours, the flowers will be out soon and are fantastic!

Not sure about the second one - need to wait a bit to see the leaf shape.

 

What are these infiltrators?

Posted: 13/04/2014 at 12:29

I'm pretty sure that is Black Bryony, a wild plant which I also have growing in part of my garden.  It has lovely glossy heart-shaped leaves and stunning berries later in the year.  It is a member of the yam family and grows from a large underground root.  It can overwhelm shrubs and small trees if allowed to grow through them, so I give it a large cane to grow up.

http://www.jeremybartlett.co.uk/2012/02/07/black-bryony-tamus-communis/

http://wildflowerfinder.org.uk/Flowers/B/Bryony(Black)/Bryony(Black).htm

 

 

crocus for plug plants?

Posted: 12/04/2014 at 21:10

Crocus plugs are usually ok.  The best thing to do with plugs is to plant them into small pots using multi-purpose compost as soon as they arrive - I usually use 7cm square ones from Wilko.  It's important not to leave them as plugs for any length of time as they have been grown in special conditions and won't survive long if not given some TLC.  Grow them in the small pots for at least a couple of weeks before finally planting out into their final pots or containers etc.

Lily of the Valley

Posted: 12/04/2014 at 11:20

From my experience, Lily of the valley has no 'mid ground';  It either won't establish and dies on you or decides to invade your garden taking no prisoners!  A bit like an awkward child really - you either can't get them into their bed at night or can't get them out of it in the morning!

Weeds!

Posted: 09/04/2014 at 21:03

My money is on the couch grass which nut suggested.  Gently dig down on one and see if the blade is connected to a horizontal white/brown root to confirm.  If so, you need to carefully remove all of that although spot treatment of the blades with glyphosate sometimes kills it.  If you break the root whilst cultivating the soil, each piece grows - it's almost as bad as bindweed in that way.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 77
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 324
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 368
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 57    Views: 2146
Last Post: 11/02/2014 at 11:06

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 890
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 321
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1282
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 460
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20

Sparrows!

The sparrows have had a good breeding season 
Replies: 15    Views: 563
Last Post: 07/10/2013 at 09:26

why-all-the-hyphens-in-post-titles

Replies: 4    Views: 319
Last Post: 10/08/2013 at 11:31

ID trumpet flower

Replies: 8    Views: 412
Last Post: 18/06/2013 at 11:41

Bee spotting

Have you seen any bees yet? 
Replies: 61    Views: 2006
Last Post: 11/04/2013 at 18:55

New deliveries

Tree and shrub planting 
Replies: 4    Views: 374
Last Post: 16/02/2013 at 19:01

Flower ID

Pink flowered perennial 
Replies: 4    Views: 692
Last Post: 10/07/2012 at 16:52

Oh no, lily beetles are back!

More of warning than a plea for help.. 
Replies: 21    Views: 6619
Last Post: Yesterday at 22:14
15 threads returned