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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Planting Jasmine nudiflorum

Posted: 30/11/2013 at 12:47

Not really, Lulu - it's one of the least fussy shrubs there is.   Plant in full sun for the best flowers but it'll handle part shade.

hawian palm tree

Posted: 29/11/2013 at 21:59

Barbara, I would treat it like any houseplant:  Never overwater - if the compost feels at all damp, do not water it until it feels very dry.  Keep away from central heating if possible - most houseplants hate it.  In the Winter, keep it on a South-facing windowsill, in the Summer move it to to somewhere more shaded.  Don't forget to feed it - use baby bio etc diluted to the rate recommended on the bottle.

Cleaning plastic plant labels

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 23:52

Same experience here with the actual plastic going brittle after only one season, fidgetbones.  They really need to make them from UV-proof plastic.  UPVC as used to make windows would be ideal but google isn't coming up with anything.  I'm sure someone could make a lot of money by selling slightly more expensive but longer lasting ones - a 5 year life would be fine.  There are plenty of expensive ones (some £5 each!) but no middle ground it seems.

Talkback: How to force rhubarb

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 22:01

I was assuming the former Dove.  I think what you do is quite a common method of keeping it tender and, as you say, getting a slightly earlier crop.

Peppers

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 21:41

Yes David, an early start is essential in our climate.  You must keep them above 12C at all times though, so starting early has its drawbacks.  If young plants get chilled it will usually 'set them back' and they may not do as well as seeds sown later.  I usually do 2 or 3 sowings so I have the best chance of success and grow the young plants on windowsills or in the conservatory until night temperatures in the greenhouse don't fall below 12C.  It can be challenging some years.

Choose early varieties too - this supplier has some good ones (no connection):

http://www.realseeds.co.uk/sweetpeppers.html

 

Talkback: How to force rhubarb

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 21:26

Any type of 'forcing' will weaken a crown.  The only reason to do it is to get an earlier crop at the expense of using up the stored energy in the crown.  I was originally done in areas where they grew thousands of crowns so they could use a proportion for forcing each year (to extend the season - ie for making money!) which, when exhausted, would be replanted and left to grow for a few years to build-up the crown again while being cropped normally.  Unless you have several rhubarb plants growing I think forcing is a waste of time for the home gardener.

HELLO FORKERS!

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 19:06

Hope Clueless is getting better.  What's happened to FairyGirl?  Not seen any posts from her for a while..

ORNAMENTAL APPLE TREE

Posted: 28/11/2013 at 18:47

Hi Nadger, Yes that is young and it is important to prune it properly in the early years to help it form a good shape.  Prune it when completely dormant - if it still has any leaves on, leave it for a while - I usually do mine in January/February, but never during a prolonged hard frost.  For both ornamental and edible apples, the pruning is the same when they are young.  Cut each branch back by about a third to half, to a bud facing in the direction you want it to grow (usually that's an outward facing one.)

Branches which are pruned will have stronger growth next year than any which you don't prune, so although it seems illogical, if the tree is growing weakly on one side, prune that side harder.

Here's the RHS advice on pruning young apples:

http://apps.rhs.org.uk/AdviceSearch/profile.aspx?PID=164

and the diagrams here may help:

http://www.gardenaction.co.uk/fruit_veg_diary/fruit_veg_mini_project_september_2d_apple.asp

 

 

If you could invent something...

Posted: 27/11/2013 at 23:09

Great idea, Dove - I'll sign-up for a tardis-shed right now!

How about trowels and secateurs which emit a beep when you click a remote on your key-ring so you can find them in the garden?  I spend ages looking for mine after leaving them somewhere after getting distracted! 

Peppers

Posted: 27/11/2013 at 22:54

Hi David, while you can overwinter peppers, they do need to be kept warmer than in an unheated greenhouse.  I've done it by keeping them in a back room of the house where it never dropped below about 15C but I wouldn't say it was really worth it as ones grown from seed actually did better that year.  Due to the cold Spring this year, there wasn't really a long enough warm period to successfully grow peppers outdoors - they need quite a long season.  To be sure of a crop in the uk we really need to grow them in a greenhouse although it's fine to take them out into the open during the height of the Summer.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 76
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 316
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 366
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 57    Views: 2140
Last Post: 11/02/2014 at 11:06

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 887
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 319
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1279
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 459
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20

Sparrows!

The sparrows have had a good breeding season 
Replies: 15    Views: 562
Last Post: 07/10/2013 at 09:26

why-all-the-hyphens-in-post-titles

Replies: 4    Views: 317
Last Post: 10/08/2013 at 11:31

ID trumpet flower

Replies: 8    Views: 411
Last Post: 18/06/2013 at 11:41

Bee spotting

Have you seen any bees yet? 
Replies: 61    Views: 2001
Last Post: 11/04/2013 at 18:55

New deliveries

Tree and shrub planting 
Replies: 4    Views: 373
Last Post: 16/02/2013 at 19:01

Flower ID

Pink flowered perennial 
Replies: 4    Views: 689
Last Post: 10/07/2012 at 16:52

Oh no, lily beetles are back!

More of warning than a plea for help.. 
Replies: 20    Views: 6521
Last Post: Yesterday at 19:38
15 threads returned