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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Blueberry

Posted: 28/06/2014 at 12:50

Hi bekkie, in your case I think you would be OK as rhodos and azaleas also need acid soil so that looks like what you have.  No harm in adding some ericaceous compost to the hole and mulching beneath the bushes with ericaceous bark will be beneficial. 

Blueberry

Posted: 28/06/2014 at 12:31

Bekkie and anyone else considering this, test your soil pH before planting blueberries in the ground.  Blueberries require a low pH of about 4 to 4.5 to do well.  This is easily controlled in a container by using ericaceous compost but that compost doesn't work so well when added to the ground as the natural pH of your soil will always eventually dominate.  If your soil is alkaline, then it can even kill blueberries or at best the crop will fall dramatically.  Many growers (including myself) find that blueberries actually prefer to be grown in containers and the best advice I can offer is to use large ones.  Fill with a mixture consisting of 50% John Innes formula No 3 (or, alternatively, topsoil), 30% ericaceous compost and 20% well rotted farmyard manure (bagged stuff from garden centres is ideal) all mixed with a handful of fish, blood and bone.  After planting, mulch with a layer of ericaceous composted bark to help keep the roots damp at all times (blueberries have feeding roots very close to the surface and if these dry out, that's when you see problems.)  Feed regularly with a liquid feed which is designed for ericaceous plants.  For the first 2 years, also feed extra nitrogen (eg nettle 'tea') to encourage lots of long, leafy stems to develop - these will bear the fruit in future years.

I do, however, agree that for the vast majority of fruit (well, plants in general) that in the ground is always preferable.  It's just that blueberries are fussy little b*99ers and do require special treatment.

Small clear resin-like drop on plum fruits

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 22:54

It's resin!  The tree produces it as a defence and to help heal itself.  It's the tree equivalent of a human scab.  As fidgetbones said, the most likely cause is that bugs pierced the skin of the fruit.

Raised beds

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 22:01

I used decking planks and 50x50mm vertical stakes about every 80cm of length.  This is strong enough and the wood is pre-treated so will last a good few years if also lined on the inside.  These are only about 2 feet high though:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/50989.jpg?width=350

There's over 2 cubic metres of topsoil in them, weighing about 2 tonnes.

Help please?!

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 21:36

If you can try and identify the greenhouse manufacturer, they could probably help, but that may be easier said than done!  It might also be worth sending that photo as an email attachment to some of the greenhouse spares suppliers like the one in the link I used as an example - they may well be able to ID it for you, even if they can't supply the parts.

Help please?!

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 21:15

OK, those prevent the glass from sliding down the roof and how that is done varies (on mine, there is a lip built into the frame itself) but you must also use W-clips.  If you fit 3 W-clips to each side of a pane, they should grip it well enough to prevent the glass sliding down.

Help to value fruit trees

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 21:07

Yes, as fidget said, and add that to the cost of buying pot-grown trees which are as old as you can find (which will probably be 2 year olds.)

Help please?!

Posted: 27/06/2014 at 20:56

If you can't see what you need on this page:

http://www.greenhousepeople.co.uk/categories/spare-parts/glazing/

please upload a photo as I can't really identify what you mean from what you have written.  The 'glazing clips' on the above page are what are used on 99% of aluminium greenhouses to hold the glass in place.  They are fitted like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McNkhzYRRr8

 

Cornflower overload

Posted: 26/06/2014 at 22:03

As long as you take a good clump of soil with the roots you will probably be fine.  Water well before and then water the moved ones every day for a week or so.

ID help please

Posted: 26/06/2014 at 21:37

I think nut is right - maybe musk mallow.  I asked a similar question a few years ago when I first joined - in my case the seed was in a 'bee' or 'wild' flower mix.  Mine is a short-lived perennial and also self-seeds, so I still have it.

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1 to 15 of 25 threads