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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

honey fungus

Posted: 16/09/2013 at 18:55

If you have the tree (including roots) removed, this may help.  Honey Fungus requires a home/base of dead wood to grow from.  If this 'home' is rotten wood within your old cherry tree, complete removal of the tree and roots followed by cultivation of the soil in the area might well rid you of the problem.  If the infected roots aren't removed as well as the tree, it could remain a problem for many years.  You might find this fact sheet (pdf) useful:

http://www.gov.gg/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=4797&p=0

 

Planting Potatoes

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 23:45

The only way to have home-grown potatoes most of the year is to grow all of the types above but many more maincrop than the rest.  Store the maincrop ones in sacks in a cool dark place.  By doing this I manage to not have to buy potatoes for about 10 months on average but haven't quite made a full year.

Caterpillars

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 23:28

Could it be a Buff-tip moth caterpillar?  Quite a big moth.

Leeks

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 23:11

It's caused by spores of the leek rust fungus which are blown in by wind.  As the particular rust which affects leeks spends its whole time on living plants and doesn't survive on dead leaves, it's likely it was blown from another infected plant in the surrounding area.  Leeks are one of the few veg that can be growing at any time of the year, so there's always a host around somewhere.  I had it on my leeks about 10 years ago but never before or since.

Help needed plant/weed

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 22:14

A fine example of a weed called Fat Hen which produces abot 20,000 seeds so it's not surprising they get everywhere and probably in the compost of the plant you were given!  Here the link on this site:

http://www.gardenersworld.com/how-to/problems/weeds/fat-hen/467.html

 

Grape vines

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 19:07

Hi Jacqui, yes it will much prefer being in the ground to a pot.  You can plant it out at any time, but now is ideal.  Congrats of finding a home you are happy to finally settle in!  

Bilberry

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 12:29

Good idea about the windbreak, Obeliixx - now you've mentioned it I think I'll do the same with fleece and leave the frame up so it can be netted after the bees have done their job to prevent the birds scoffing the lot!  I was thinking of building a proper fruit cage and moving everything into it but, like you, I don't mind the birds having a fair share.  However, I've a feeling the wood pigeons equate the phrase "fair share" with "eat every single one even if it means getting too heavy to fly"!

re- what to grow next year

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 12:19

Simon, the 'fartichoke' thing is genetic - either you are affected or aren't.  I am, but that has never stopped me from eating them - superb roasted!  Once you plant them they are there forever though (barring glyphosate) - I still have them coming up in my fuit patch even though Ive been digging every one up as soon as I see it for 6 or 7 years.

I agree about climbing French beans but they are a bit picky about the weather so growing several types every year is good insurance against one of them giving a poor crop.  Cobra usually do well for me but were pitiful last year.

What's the star in your garden right now

Posted: 13/09/2013 at 09:39

I'll lift the red one, Verdun, but the others will have to take their chances - 50/50 judging by previous years (providing I keep the slugs off, otherwise it's zero!) 

Chicky, I find them easy from seed but do raise them in the conservatory as the seedlings are very sensitive to cold and snuff it even at the mere mention of frost!  I grow them on to be quite large plants (12" tall in 5" pots) before planting out.

Thanks for the kind comments - late clematis, dahlias, cosmos and geranium wallichainum are the mainstays in my garden for colour from now to the frosts.

Whats the difference,Fresh or green.

Posted: 12/09/2013 at 22:29

As my OH always seems to be in the bathroom when I need it, my compost heap has a very useful second function!   Some folk are a bit put off by the thought of using compost that has been thus watered so I tend not to mention it to non-gardeners (even though urine is sterile at the point of exit..)

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 76
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 316
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
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Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 57    Views: 2139
Last Post: 11/02/2014 at 11:06

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 884
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 319
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1279
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 458
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20

Sparrows!

The sparrows have had a good breeding season 
Replies: 15    Views: 562
Last Post: 07/10/2013 at 09:26

why-all-the-hyphens-in-post-titles

Replies: 4    Views: 317
Last Post: 10/08/2013 at 11:31

ID trumpet flower

Replies: 8    Views: 410
Last Post: 18/06/2013 at 11:41

Bee spotting

Have you seen any bees yet? 
Replies: 61    Views: 2001
Last Post: 11/04/2013 at 18:55

New deliveries

Tree and shrub planting 
Replies: 4    Views: 373
Last Post: 16/02/2013 at 19:01

Flower ID

Pink flowered perennial 
Replies: 4    Views: 688
Last Post: 10/07/2012 at 16:52

Oh no, lily beetles are back!

More of warning than a plea for help.. 
Replies: 20    Views: 6520
Last Post: Yesterday at 19:38
15 threads returned