London (change)
Today 13°C / 8°C
Tomorrow 12°C / 9°C

BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Bilberry

Posted: 11/09/2013 at 11:06

Obelilixx, the bilberries are about 18 inches wide and about a foot tall - leaves still green at the moment, but some of my blueberry leaves are turning that lovely red colour.  I had the same problem with the blueberry flowers being frosted with the late start we had this year so also few berries.  With luck we'll have a better start next Spring!

Alan, I also understand bilberries are tricky to grow and that they must have acid soil which never dries out, so have planted them in ericaceous compost, watering regularly with rainwater from my water butts and have been feeding them with ericaceous feed.  I've not had any fruit yet so can't tell you which I prefer!  They apparently have a smaller crop per bush than blueberries though, so you might want to take that into consideration.

Bilberry

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 23:24

Hi all, I noticed earlier today that both of my bilberries are in flower!  They were only planted (in large tubs of ericaceous compost) last Autumn but flowered in about May/June this year (no fruit set).  They both look very healthy but are obviously a bit confused!

Spurge?

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 19:21

A weed is just a plant in the wrong place, Charlie!  If you like it (and I can see why), keep some seed and sow it next spring.  It's an annual so will die after seeding anyway.

Spurge?

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 16:28

Same here Fleurisa - once they seed (and they produce a lot of seed) you have them forever.  Luckily they pull up easily but watch the white sap (which is why they are called milkweed) as it irritates the skin after exposure to sunlight.

potato plants

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 16:25

The seeds can be grown but it takes a few years of saving he tiny tubers and replanting them before you have a decent crop but you can end up with a new variety.  This is how new potato varieties are developed of course.  An interesting project but quite a lot of work and they could be rubbish!

Apple tree with white leaves

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 14:11

Did you buy it as a grafted tree, Charlie, or was it grown from seed?  If it is a grafted tree, it does have some green in it so it looks like a soil nutrient deficiency.  As you say, the other plants nearby look healthy though.  Fruit trees don't like competition near their roots though and do need regular feeding.  I'd remove all plants with 0.5 metres and give it a general feed with something which states it also contains trace nutrients in case it is one of the rarer deficiencies.

Leaking greenhouse

Posted: 10/09/2013 at 13:03

As tea drinker says, next time it rains you need to go to the greenhouse and see what the problem is.  Sometimes the glass slips over the bottom rail and you end up with a gap at the ridge, otherwise leaking seals are the most likely.  Be extremely careful if removing panes of horticultural glass as it becomes brittle over time and if a pane breaks the broken pieces are potentially lethal, so always get someone else to help and never stand beneath a pane which is being removed (and remove from the outside only)!

Jelly like substance

Posted: 09/09/2013 at 23:58

I don't see why not gardenjeannie.  You'd have to probably experiment a bit to get the amount right.  However, I read somewhere that they don't really help all that much with retaining water anyway (they did a test with identical hanging baskets) so I don't bother using them anymore.

Talkback: Leaf miner fly

Posted: 09/09/2013 at 22:02

There's not much you can do, but assuming it's Scaptomyza flava (a small fly about 2.5mm long), I think it's only active at certain times of the year (now being one of them), so fleecing the crop from midsummer is probably the best bet.  Apparently this particular species is becoming a serious pest for commercial brassica growers, so it might be worth googling.

Sparrows!

Posted: 09/09/2013 at 21:45

Thanks for the kind comments!  They are very cheery little things if a bit on the skittish side.  There are a few dunnocks down the far end but they do let me get very close.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 77
Last Post: 15/04/2014 at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 16    Views: 324
Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 368
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 57    Views: 2146
Last Post: 11/02/2014 at 11:06

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 890
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 321
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1282
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 460
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20

Sparrows!

The sparrows have had a good breeding season 
Replies: 15    Views: 563
Last Post: 07/10/2013 at 09:26

why-all-the-hyphens-in-post-titles

Replies: 4    Views: 319
Last Post: 10/08/2013 at 11:31

ID trumpet flower

Replies: 8    Views: 412
Last Post: 18/06/2013 at 11:41

Bee spotting

Have you seen any bees yet? 
Replies: 61    Views: 2006
Last Post: 11/04/2013 at 18:55

New deliveries

Tree and shrub planting 
Replies: 4    Views: 374
Last Post: 16/02/2013 at 19:01

Flower ID

Pink flowered perennial 
Replies: 4    Views: 692
Last Post: 10/07/2012 at 16:52

Oh no, lily beetles are back!

More of warning than a plea for help.. 
Replies: 21    Views: 6618
Last Post: Yesterday at 22:14
15 threads returned