BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Growing from seed

Posted: 30/03/2014 at 10:16

Hi little bee, I agree with the above.  It's important to remove the tops of propagator trays as soon as the seeds have germinated.  What I do is sow the seeds into the tray, water once from the bottom - as soon as the top of the compost starts to change colour they have had enough.  Put the top on and do no more watering until the seedlings show, then remove the top.  After that, water when the compost starts to dry out - I judge that by lifting the tray and feeling how heavy it is.

Carrots need direct sowing into their final growing position - they won't transplant well and even if they do survive being pricked-out, they will produce poor roots.  When carrot seedlings germinate, they send down a very thin but very long single root.  This becomes the carrot and it is virtually impossible to transplant them without damaging this root which can become 15cm long in a matter of days after germination.

Did you remember to turn your clocks back?

Posted: 30/03/2014 at 09:52

Is my evergreen dying?

Posted: 29/03/2014 at 21:40

If I had a similar space, I'd probably go for one of those narrow, tall flowering cherries called Prunus Amanogawa.  Always wanted one!

Help - is my evergreen dying?

Posted: 29/03/2014 at 15:38

See answer to your other identical question, Kelly.

Is my evergreen dying?

Posted: 29/03/2014 at 15:34

It's a fir tree of some kind.  Unfortunately, the brown sections are dead and won't regrow fresh green growth.  If you follow the brown down and find there are green shoots below, cut the brown section off just above where the healthy growth is.  If you're very, very, lucky the green shoots may grow and cover the bare parts you have now revealed.  However, in the vast majority of cases, the tree will continue to die back, so seriously consider removing it and seeing this as an opportunity to plant something else.

Stratification of Seeds

Posted: 27/03/2014 at 23:30

Most of the things I've read say six weeks but mine have been in about 4 and are coming out this weekend.  If nothing happens they can always go back in..

fly

Posted: 27/03/2014 at 22:47

Whitefly in particular can be very difficult to control, especially if you have them at this time of the year.  As you clearly want to be as organic as possible, I think the answer for you is biological control using a parasitic wasp called encarsia formosa.  It's a bit too cold to use them right now, but it should be ok in a few weeks.  Not cheap but google should find you the best price.

Stratification of Seeds

Posted: 27/03/2014 at 22:38

I've also got some nematodes in there but I bit my tongue when she asked what they were and said "specials" as I don't think "microscopic worms" would have gone down too well!   It's probably a lot cheaper to run a fridge in an unheated shed, nut.

Clematis

Posted: 27/03/2014 at 22:24

lills, have you tried growing your clematis in deep pots for a year before planting?  I always do this when buying young clematis and have excellent success rates when I plant them into their final positions.  I always prepare a very deep hole and fill with home made compost, before planting the year-old clematis about 4-6 inches deeper than when they were in the pots.  Before I started doing this (many years ago) I lost a lot of plants in the first year, mainly because many of the well-known suppliers do send plants which are too small to successfully plant out.  This is the sort of thing I use:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/301131705445?lpid=83&clk_rvr_id=610171905104&item=301131705445&lgeo=1&vectorid=229508

 Edit: note that the better suppliers tend to send you plants in this size pot.  More expensive but far more likely to thrive, so well worth the extra.

Stratification of Seeds

Posted: 27/03/2014 at 22:12

Like nut, I use this method for certain seeds, particularly trees and shrubs.  I'm also having to resort to the fridge this year due to lack of long enough cold spells.  Acers in there at the moment.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

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Oops!

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Cost of bird food

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Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
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