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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Beans - All sorts - Soil Prep

Posted: 12/10/2014 at 15:43

Newboy2, what a lot of us do is dig a trench now and keep throwing in vegetable matter such as kitchen waste and shredded garden prunings, pulled-up annual weeds and the like, often adding shredded newspaper and cardboard.  At the end of the winter, we cover the open trench with soil and by the time it comes to bean-planting time, it will have all rotted down and will help to hold moisture deep down which bean roots love.

You can grow just about anything in raised beds with the possible exception of the taller brassicas as those need firm soil to do well.  Beans usually thrive providing you keep up with the watering.

Winter greenhouse

Posted: 12/10/2014 at 13:50

If you have any outdoor potted semi-hardy plants you can give them protection by bringing them into the GH.  If you plant bulbs in pots they will flower a week or three earlier Inside the GH.  I always have few pots of bulbs in there over the winter.

Fruit trees

Posted: 12/10/2014 at 12:37

Barry, most fruit trees are grafted onto different rootstocks so see if you can find the graft points.  If the only growth is from below that point it means the grafts have failed and you would be well advised to replace the trees as the growth from the rootstocks won't produce decent fruit.  The graft union will look a bit "knobbly" like this image I grabbed from google:

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/61933.jpg?width=350

If there is some growth above the union you will be OK but must remove all growth from below it or the (usually wild tree) rootstock will take over and the fruiting tree which has been grafted on to it will die.

Mould

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 18:27

Yvie -

Fairy is right as well, once the cuttings have roots they don't need the heat any more, just sheltered conditions with plenty of light.

Evergreen jasmine - when to prune?

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 18:20

Is it an indoor type?  There are only a couple of evergreen outdoor types and those are really semi-evergreen in the UK.  Like most shrubs, pruning is generally best done immediately after flowering so I would re-pot it and just tidy the broken and bent bits for now by pruning back to a bud or just above a leaf joint.

Pruning roses

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 18:02

That one is a climbing hybrid tea rose.  You can prune them hard when needed and do that over the winter.  Start by cutting out any damaged or diseased bits, then cut some of the oldest stems right down to the ground and prune the remaining long ones by about a third.  For more details,  look under 'renovating overgrown climbers' on this RHS page:

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=189

Step back a few times during any kind of pruning to make sure the overall shape seems balanced.  In general, hard pruning leads to new strong growth so don't worry too much about a good cut-back which will likely do much more good than harm.

 

Fruit trees

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 16:46

I use a 4" high thick coating of Vaseline John, around the trunk just below where the first branch comes out of the trunk.  You can also buy grease bands from garden centres.  I renew it yearly or if I accidentally rub any off in the normal course of gardening.  One thing to realise is that ants will climb other nearby plants to get to the tree, so leave plenty of space around your fruit trees or cut-down the parts of any other plants which touch the tree above where you placed the grease band.

Moving thick heavy clay to another part of garden?

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 15:44

There's actually some controversy regarding the efficacy of adding gypsum and I think that's because there are so many types of 'clay soil'.  What I did and recommend is to do some testing on small areas of your own soil, using various amounts and started with one good handful per square yard.  There are no typical dosage figures as it depends completely on the chemistry of your particular soil.  Gypsum is Calcium Sulphate and if your clay is in a limestone area, it probably won't help.  It can take 2-3 years to show any effect.

Adding lots of organic matter, however, is always going to help improve clay soils and will have an immediate effect but gypsum is certainly worth trying as it can really help some types of clay soils.

Pruning roses

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 15:27

SJ, that variety is one of the 'Portland' types, so you know which pruning method is needed if you look this up on google or in books.

Portland types are repeat flowerers and are normally pruned in late winter.  Have a look at the RHS guide (scroll down the page to 'Repeat flowering shrub roses':

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=178

 

 

Moving thick heavy clay to another part of garden?

Posted: 11/10/2014 at 15:09

The 'clay breaker' Bamboogie mentions is actually gypsum.  The cheapest way of obtaining gypsum is as 25kg bags of plaster (yes, the stuff for going on walls) from a builder's merchant - the cheapest stuff is actually the best for this as it will contain no additives.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

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Flew into the polytunnel for a while 
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Deep Down & Dirty: The Science of soil

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Check your delphiniums for caterpillars

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Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
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Oops!

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Last Post: 16/04/2014 at 19:05
1 to 15 of 28 threads