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BobTheGardener


Latest posts by BobTheGardener

Will security lightning / street lighting upset my vegetable plot?

Posted: 16/08/2013 at 18:57

I would be livid if that security light was shining in my garden.  Bad for wildlife (including humans) as well as the fact that any amateur astronomers with a couple of hundred yards will have their hobby ruined.

runner-beans

Posted: 16/08/2013 at 18:48

Many years ago 3 or 4 of my runner bean roots, left in the soil over Winter, sprouted and grew again in the Spring.  They are perennial in their native habitat, but it takes a special set of circumstances for them to survive in the UK.  I think it must have been a mild, dry Winter that year.  It might be possible to lift and store them like dahlias but I doubt the effort would be worth it considering how quickly they grow from seed.

summer/autumn-raspberries

Posted: 15/08/2013 at 23:28

I think they are likely to be what are now called primocanes with a good example being 'Polka'.  They are really an Autumn fruiting variety but by doing as waterbutts suggests and cutting down only the fruited canes, you can get 2 crops per year from the one variety.  There is a short explanation in the first paragraph of the Polka ordering page at the RHS shop:

http://www.rhsplants.co.uk/plants/_/fruit/bush/berries-etc/raspberry-plants/fruit-plants/fruit-and-nuts/cane-fruit/raspberry-polka-pbr/classid.2000011104/

 

 

black-spot

Posted: 15/08/2013 at 20:05

I agree, the best bet is to buy resistant varieties.  I have a lovely 'Peace' but it gets devastated every year, regardless of what I do.  Two resistant varieties planted just feet away are untouched.  As long as the Peace continues to flower it's socks off I'll probably keep it even if it does look unsightly at times.

moss

Posted: 15/08/2013 at 19:06

Hi jonothan, yes - the Japanese love growing this in their gardens.  Just google "how to grow moss" - I got 136 million hits and the top few seemed to have all the information needed.

anyone-know-what-this-is

Posted: 15/08/2013 at 19:01

As an aside armaghgirl, most plants in gardens are poisonous.  Luckily, mammals are generally not stupid enough to eat them (if fact most poisonous plants taste very nasty.)  The younger and less bright mammals (which usually have only two legs) luckily have ears, eyes and can understand language, so can be easily taught not to put such things into their mouths.

mulching-machine

Posted: 15/08/2013 at 18:48

It doesn't matter what make/model, the only way to shred is to have two piles of stuff, one green stuff and one dry stuff.  You need to mix them while shredding, so that about 80% is dry matter and 20% wet.  In other words you need to feed in 4 parts dry matter with one part wet matter.  That is all there is to it.  By following this rule of thumb, I can shred for several hours without blocking my Alko.

cabbage-plants-

Posted: 14/08/2013 at 23:54

Hi lucky3, the trick to preventing caterpillars is to net the plants to stop butterflies laying their eggs in the first place.  You can't buy a spray that will stop them laying eggs, but you can buy sprays that will kill the caterpillars without (allegedly) harming anyone who eats the sprayed plants, provided the instructions on the label are followed properly.  Google "bug clear for fruit & veg".

harvesting-butternut-squash

Posted: 11/08/2013 at 22:42

Hi Madeleine, they are ready whenever they are big enough to use but will become tastier and sweeter as they mature.  There is a colour change but that will happen whether they are on or off the vine.  Personally, I leave them on the vine until either all the leaves have yellowed (so growth is therefore finished) or the first frost is forecast.  They cannot take any degree of frost and won't store if they get even a mild ground frost, so don't let that happen.  Basically I treat them as a true winter vegetable and store them indoors on windowsills until they are needed - they look very attractive and I've had them last until Spring (they might last even longer, but I couldn't!)

stags-horn-sumach

Posted: 11/08/2013 at 18:05

The problem with hard pruning this one is that it will send up *lots* of suckers.  Personally, I would try removing it and plant something else.  Try and get all of the roots out if you decide to do that or you will be plagued with suckers.

Discussions started by BobTheGardener

Seed grown Wisteria finally in flower - Hooray!

Planted many years ago 
Replies: 3    Views: 60
Last Post: Yesterday at 12:39

Oops!

Polytunnel growing 
Replies: 13    Views: 251
Last Post: Yesterday at 23:28

First day of (meteorological) Spring

How id your garden looking 
Replies: 13    Views: 366
Last Post: 03/03/2014 at 20:31

DIY heated propagator

Making one from scratch 
Replies: 57    Views: 2116
Last Post: 11/02/2014 at 11:06

Cost of bird food

bulk vs supermarket 
Replies: 31    Views: 879
Last Post: 10/02/2014 at 12:33

Wild Garden (Community Channel)

On Freeview/Sky 
Replies: 5    Views: 316
Last Post: 10/12/2013 at 12:21

Front garden revamp - before and after photos

Redsigning weedy crazy paving 
Replies: 24    Views: 1273
Last Post: 21/10/2013 at 20:16

Bilberry

Flowering in September 
Replies: 7    Views: 457
Last Post: 13/09/2013 at 13:20

Sparrows!

The sparrows have had a good breeding season 
Replies: 15    Views: 561
Last Post: 07/10/2013 at 09:26

why-all-the-hyphens-in-post-titles

Replies: 4    Views: 314
Last Post: 10/08/2013 at 11:31

ID trumpet flower

Replies: 8    Views: 408
Last Post: 18/06/2013 at 11:41

Bee spotting

Have you seen any bees yet? 
Replies: 61    Views: 1996
Last Post: 11/04/2013 at 18:55

New deliveries

Tree and shrub planting 
Replies: 4    Views: 372
Last Post: 16/02/2013 at 19:01

Flower ID

Pink flowered perennial 
Replies: 4    Views: 687
Last Post: 10/07/2012 at 16:52

Oh no, lily beetles are back!

More of warning than a plea for help.. 
Replies: 15    Views: 6309
Last Post: Yesterday at 15:31
15 threads returned