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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

stepover trees

Posted: 04/11/2014 at 16:24

Wow, deeply impressed, hope you have great good luck with them - maybe a photo when they are in flower?

ID please

Posted: 04/11/2014 at 16:22

No need to get rid of it, just treat it with respect - don't eat it, and teach others to do the same.   If we get rid of all that is poison our how will anyone learn to deal with these plants when they occur in the wild?  They will not poison your veggies, and the plant is quite attractive, and the birds like it.  Learn to live with it I would say, and teach others to do the same. 

squirrels and their cleverness

Posted: 04/11/2014 at 16:19

I HATE squirrels!  We have a great number of them around here, and several of those regard our garden as their private banqueting hall.  I love to feed the birds, and as I don't always manage to get around easily, I need to have the feeder somewhere where I can see it, and thus the birds,g from my computer table window, from whence I am writing this.

We have lived here for 18 years, and in all that time I have been fighting to keep the squirrels off the feeders.

I have bought just about every brand and style of 'squirrel proof' feeder on the market, and not one of them is.  I have treated the feed with every flavour they are supposed to dislike, and they just ignore it.  I have used garlic, salt, soap, chilli - both fresh and dried - pepper, and probably several others I can't quite recall now.

I would not encourage other types of rats to come to my garden, so why do we have to put up with these?  We are not allowed to trap them - well, you can, but you are not permitted then to let them go as they are vermin (hear hear) so what do you do with your trapped beast?  I'm certainly not going to try and kill it, I'd almost certainly get bitten as I nearly did when I soaked one inside a `squirrel proof' feeder last year, soaking wet you could see there was no disguise for the stinking rat it is.  I do dislike them intensely but I'm not going to hit it and cause it dreadful suffering, I don't kill anything if I know about it and am not starting here. 

I could put the feeder in the middle of the grassy area, from whence I would not see it, and the birds would not use it as there would be no cover - I'm stumped!  I don't expect anyone to come up with a definitive answer, I just wanted to vent as I sit here with my cold water spray trying to catch them.  It is the only thing they run away from, and that only for a few seconds, but I cannot be there 10 hours a day with the window open, and even if I could, thy'd just get used to it I am sure.  

I've chased them off 17 times in the 10 minutes it took to write this - grrrrr.

 

 

Callicarpa

Posted: 04/11/2014 at 16:02

The most wonderful of these shrubs grew (and possibly still does) in the garden of my family in Texas!  That might give a clue as to why they do not do terribly well here?

Growing basil indoors

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 20:43

Hey, I do a funny walk at the best of times!  However, the less said about that the better ………...

Pests

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 20:42

Hi Gingly, yes, they did object for a short while, but the effect lasted - literally - about 24 hours after which they just ignored the chilli and went on eating!!

Growing basil indoors

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 17:50

Oh dear, now I shall pass any mirror very carefully in case I see John Clees looking out at me!!

Pests

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 17:50

I am interested Ceres to see that allowing the squirrels to have the seed feed they leave the bulbs alone - ours must be just gluttons, as they eat everything!  I reached using  over 2 Kg of seed a day, of which the birds got around an eighth - just far, far  too much.  Our current feeder, also guaranteed squirrel proof isn't, but it has slowed them down somewhat.  At present the best I have managed to date. 

WOTISIT

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 15:27

Indeed, weird aren't they.  Do you feel like propagating it?

Couch Grass

Posted: 30/10/2014 at 15:26

In fact, I would humbly suggest you don't rotovate at all - I know of no better system for the spread of perennial weeds that rotovation.  We lost an entire allotment plot to having it dug and rotovated, it became a dense mat of dock, mares tail, couch grass and anything else you care to name - we had to abandon ship as nothing could deal with it.   Prevention of light access and patient digging will eradicate the problem, but it does take time and back ache to get there - and does not account for seeds blowing in from elsewhere.  However, no garden or allotment is entirely free of weeds, control however is possible - sort of. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

squirrels and their cleverness

the unending bane of my life 
Replies: 34    Views: 908
Last Post: 11/11/2014 at 20:49

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
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For whom do we garden .............

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Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
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Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
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Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
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Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

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Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5779
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
8 threads returned