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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Talkback: Hostas, slugs and snails

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 12:14

Yes it is pricey, but rremember what you have paid for your plants, and it does last for ages.  If you know a friendly plumber, ask if he/she will give you some of the little scraps of copper pipe they cut off fittings - it's mostly plastic these days I know, but some copper is still used.  I put these on the ground around delicate plants, and this seems to help. I am toying with a way of fitting the copper better around the ground plants, maybe on short bit of bamboo or so - must be possible. 

Sambucus woes

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 11:33

Hi, yes cottinus would be good - needs hard pruning to give of its best copper leaves and smoke.  Physocarpus 'diabolo' is good too, more upright than cottinus, with little pink flowers.

Can you move your sambuccus?  It is such a beauty when out of the wind, but it certainly does get severe wind burn.  I grow mine in a pot and it is very good, though of course it will never get to the larger size I might have liked, but my garden is also a wind tunnel in places, so that was the only realistic option, so I could move it around until it was happy.  Where it is happy I cannot put it in the ground, about right huh? 

Talkback: Hostas, slugs and snails

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 11:27

Agree with keeping tender hostas in pots, in fact all of mine are in pots.  Each pot has a collar of copper tape around it.  Sometimes slugs will climb up the wall and drop into pots, or the leaves drape over the sides so they get up those, but on the whole it has reduced the problems to manageable size.  The copper gives out a tiny electrical charge which they will not cross - I have the idea it works for snails too as they are soft bodied underneath so I assume they would get shocked too.

The very big disgusting slugs are in fact our friends, they live on small slugs, the little ones that hide under ground, and which devastate our plants.  So although they may look awful, they are not the ones you need to get rid of to protect your hostas. 

Bugbox

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:34

Please do let us know how you get on, I am fascinated by the idea and have been considering it for single bees.  We have one that lives under a stone in our alpine bed, a neat tunnel that is sealed every winter - don't know how long solitary bees live, so maybe it is the originals grandchildren - but someone is there.  Would love to encourage more to the area. 

Where can I buy moss in Hampshire

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:32

The moss you can occasionally buy is rarely the type of smooth moss you want for your Japanese garden - it's usually sphagnum type which is taller and straggly - lovely, but not the smooth green that I imagine you want.  I'm surprised there is none in your garden already, there is in mine!   Try woodlands and hedges where there are stones and logs, it may be growing there.  It is not illegal to take things like seeds from the verges, but you may not dig anything up there.  I cannot imagine moss would be considered a problem.  Failing all that, there are Japanese garden centres around, maybe one of those could help you?  Have you tried on line, maybe search engine Japanese garden supplies? 

Anyone ever grown dwarf delphiniums and hollyhocks

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:26

Have done dwarf delphiniums, they are lovely - too windy here to grow the tall ones - haven't yet tried the hollyhocks, maybe next year - we will see. 

poorly witch hazel

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:25

Yes, indeed, a dose of ericaceous compost and some iron will pick it up no end.  Very good flowers on mine this year,  it lives in ordinary soil with the aforementioned help now and again. 

chilli/pepper

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:24

Mind rather slow yet, but they will come - and I also do nothing about thinning shoots etc., still have some extremely hot ones, dried, from a couple of years ago - last year was dreadful for us all. Pretty plants on the whole, also do well indoors on windowsils for folk with no garden space. 

Poppies in a tin hat

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:22

What you may not do at the roadside re plants is dig them up - but seeds are OK - just please don't get run over in your excitement!

Talkback: Hostas, slugs and snails

Posted: 17/06/2013 at 10:14

If you use pellets thickly they actually encourage more slugs -  more come for the  free goodies, but none get enough to actually kill them, so you end up in a worse state than before.  As welshonion says, use sparingly, and use the iron based ones, called growing success, they are as good as the others at killling slugs, but harm no other wild life.  Better yet, put a collar of copper arpund you lovely Fire and Ice hosta, they hate that.  I have that hosta, it does not get enormous but does thicken up - it is lovely now. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

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7 threads returned