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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

solitary bees

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 16:09

Yes, heard about this on springwatch this week - nature certainly has its ways huh?

Glorious weather for gardens again, off out there now. 

Talkback: Hostas, slugs and snails

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 13:43

Hi Verdun, the hostas tend to get both sun and shade as the theatre is near the house wall - so far they all thrive on it.  You are right that the ones with pale variegations such as Fire and Ice and Patriot like a bit more shade than say Devon Green, which has to be one of my favourites.  I think, as the dear late wonderful Christopher  Lloyd said when asked what his favourite flower was 'fthe one I am looking at at the moment!'.  I love all my hostas, both the huge such as Blue Angel and the tiny such as Mouse Ears - I dare not buy any more or we might have to move!!  I no longer definitely know the names of all of mine as the labels have, with the help of blackbirds - disappeared over the years.  What is it with blackbirds and labels? 

Mine only get fed once a year when the whole garden gets a dose of pelleted organic chicken manure.  They rely for the most part on rainfall for watering, though there has been the odd accasion when I have had to help that out - tho' not recently.  All are top dressed with gravel, mostly because it looks nice and makes it easier to get the weeds out.  Otherwise they are left alone, repotted when their pots break, either through frost or sheer root pressure.  I just admire them often and leave them to get on with it - and they do. 

Feeding clematis

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 11:29

They sure do need feeding, ithey are one of the few plants for which I buy specialist fertiliser, available from many plant outlets or on line  They have benefitted from this a good deal, they are very hungry plants indeed. 

solitary bees

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 11:27

How wonderful, congratulations, and thank you for the picture.  We have one that has lived under a rock in our once upon a time alpine bed for several years - or if not the same one, each year there is one - no idea how long they live.  Never been able to take a picture though, that's great. 

Talkback: Hostas, slugs and snails

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 11:24

I griow around 65 different hostas in pots, and have done for around 15 years.  I nearly gave up around 6 years ago, the slug and snail problems being virtually overwhelming.  I tried it all, hair, egg shells, garlic, porrige oats etc. et. ad nauseaum.  Then I discovered copper tape, now each pot has its own collar of copper, and that has done the trick. I have a three tiered display, like a very large auricular theratre, and the edges of that are also trimmed with copper tape.  There will always be the odd clever slug that walks up the wall and drops into the pots, but on the whole the collectiion is doing very well.  I also bury odd bits of copper tubing (from a friendly plumber) around the stems of plants that are devoured by slugs, e.g delphiniums, and that has helped enormously tool.  Apparently they get a small static shock from the copper and will not cross it.  It was quite expensive to do at first because I had to do the whole lot at once, but now just as any new pot arrives.  Do try it, it really does work.

Ferrous pellets work somewhat, but are very dangerous for children, as an overdose of iron can be lethal.  They do not harm birds and other mammals as far as I know.  Use them very sparingly and where they cannot be seen by small people.  The other kind should be abolished at once I agree.  We have no children coming to our garden so I can, and occasionally do, use these here. 

Tulips

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 11:16

Yes you can, but you will do better to try and keep the leaves on them as long as possible, as much of next years flowers will depend upon what the bulb gathers from the leaves as they dry.  I must admit that tulips are one set of bulbs I do not bother about keeping, as I find they rarely come well again, and tend to treat them, as Monty said, as annuals - except for the specie ones which do come back true.  Maybe you could hang them somewhere while the leaves dry off - maybe a pair of tights hung somewhere dry and cool while the leaves dry off?  Don't be too disappointed if, after all that, they don't grow well next Spring - but they might, so if you want to go that route - good for you, and good luck

Colour!

Posted: 06/06/2013 at 11:12

I was a nurse for nearly 50 years, and indeed, red and white flowers were deeply frowned upon - to the point where one of my senior nurses took a yellow flower from one persons vase to put in another!!  However, that won't arise these days as you're not allowed to have flowers in the hospital these days - those flowers you know, they killed so many people!!!

I love mixed borders, and am always amazed by how lovely some peoples are, especially when they are disciplined as as to what they buy or grow - mine are not disciplined, but are lovely too, just in a different way.  

Colour!

Posted: 05/06/2013 at 22:29

All colours really - they all fit together because of the amount of green that comes with most plants.  There have been some accidental colour mixtures that I did not, would not have, planned, and they have been remarkably good.  Nature just does what we cannot do, gets it right most of the time.   I think the main difference in peoples gardens, as far as colour is concerned, is how formal they want to be.  If you want a fairly formal layout then that choice will probably influence the colours you use and put togethr. My garden could not be less formal, so the rather riotous look lends itself more to colour combinations we might not choose in a more formal setting.

Some of the gardens people show here are just so amazingly good, beautifully designed and so on, and I love to see and admire them - but they are not my style.  There is room for all of us, and our colour choices I think.

Also our colour perception changes with age I think - my friend disliked yellow in her garden  for years, and now enjoys it in moderation.  I suspect she sees it differently now - our older eyes may not percieve colour quite as clearly as we once did.

 

 

Dahlias..an unintended trial

Posted: 05/06/2013 at 22:20

The ones I lleft in pots survived, though one was very late starting and I did think Ihad lost it. Some were in the cold greenhouse over winter, some not - the larger pots I just could not move.  Don't have so many but all OK so far. 

Pear Tree

Posted: 05/06/2013 at 22:16

It may well just be dropping some of the young fruits that it cannot bring to fruition this year, the June drop is quite normal, you should still get a good crop.

Discussions started by Bookertoo

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Use of the English language! 
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the unending bane of my life 
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Where and how? 
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frosted lilies

any advice? 
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out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
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bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
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Hazel nut queries

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Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
10 threads returned