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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Starting seeds

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:51

You could also invest in a solar heater - or a gas one, but the reality is tou don't need it.  Just keeping the frost and wind off the seed trays will be a huge help, use a cover in there and they will romp away.  Horticulatural fleece is very useful - or old net curtains if you have some. 

No such thing as a silly question, all are interesting and useful to someone. 

What To Train Up Obelisk ?

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:48

A small climbing or rambling rose, honeysuckle, canary creeper (annual and yellow but still...), lobata, sweet peas, runner beans - not a joke, they are very pretty in flower, were introduced as a flowering plant - then you get good grub afterwards. 

Help

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 17:44

I think the best thing you can do at a garden centre, is take the amount of cash you are willing to spend, and leave the credit / debit card at home!!!  This is from  someone who accpmanied a friend yesterday, had no intention of buying anything and spent £50+!! Ooops.

clematis

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 15:33

You can grow anything in a pot if you are prepared to give it all the time and attention it will need.  Having said that, any clematis with montana in its name will get huge, heavy and want to spread a vast distance - so any grown in a pot will require a good deal of space, and a pretty vast pot  There are better, far smaller ones, more suitable for pot culture than the montana group.  We have 3 montana, in the ground, and the space to allow them to grow large, and they have - and lovley they are too, as they are now coming into flower - but not really ideal for pot growth. IMHO.

If you desperately want this one, and must grow it in a pot, then start with a good sized pot and be prepared to go up a size or two each year as it grows until you really cannot get any bigger.  I have other clematis in pots 18 - 24 inches wide and up to 30 - 36 inches deep, these will not hold a montana for long I don't think.  Of course, someone may tell you differently and that is fine .....  It will not achieve the growth it would like to, and although I can and do grow nealry anything in pots, it would seem quite a challenge, and I am not at all sure how long it could last - whereas montanas in the ground can last for many years.  

Tatties

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 15:25

I think he puts them in a raised mound to begin with, rather than in a flat part of the ground.  Maybe to help drainage if it gets very wet, so they don't rot.  You can earth up then as they grow.  Whatever you do, they will grow, and give  you a crop - tho' earthing up is supposed to increase what you get. 

Clematis Suggestions

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 15:23

Hello, there, welcome to the site, lovely to have new gardeners join the group.  Hope you come  to love gardening and get as besotted as the rest of us as time goes on.

Clematis are a huge group of plants, there are very early pretty litttle alpina types, very hardy viticellas, and the less hardy large flowered ones.  That is only a tiny taster of the tyes available.  Much will depend on a) where you are, b) what type of soil you have, c) the postion you waant to grow them in - and so forth.  There are some wonderful web sites and books about this huge group of gorgeous plants, maybe a trip to your local lbrary would be useful?  I would not buy very small plugs, but decent sized plants whichever you chose, unless you somewhere under cover to bring them on for a year or two.  I tend to avoid markets as the plants have often come from hot houses to cold streets and then suffer from shock.  There are plenty to chose from in good garden centres and better yet, specialist nurseries which deal on line,.  You can pay almost anything from a fiver to a fairly large amount of money depending on the type you want. 

We have three huge montanas, and luckliy the space to put them in as they get absolutely huge, plus a couple of late flowered ones, some non-climbing ones, a couple of winter ones and a couple of large flowered ones - so you see it not that easy to choose.  They are all worth the trouble to grow, some are far easier than others, which may be a good place to begin if you have not grown them before.  Having now thoroughly confused you I'll stop and let you look around and see what you really like.  Enjoy the search. 

small garden pond pump ?

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 13:58

Try a solar pump, no wiring and they are very good these days.  My son put one in when his electric one died, and has actually had to reduce the amount of spray it put out as it emptied his pond in 2 days!!  Much better for all, environment and pond. 

Ilex aquifolium golden king

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 13:57

Any male holly - I'd be surprised if there was not one nearby in the area, but if not Silver Queen is a male and pollinates Golden King (female) well.  I often wonder who named these and if they understood plants have make and female types?  

holly shrubs

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 13:55

They also need space, I plante some too close to each other and lost a couple, which gave the rest room to grow well!  As dove and steve say, they need very good drainage and wlll not tolerate wet feet.  Can't fault them for that myself. 

Help

Posted: 23/05/2013 at 13:53

Yes, and it can become a ferocious weed in the garden - most things that look gorgeous hanging over peoples walls do.  You need to clip it hard after flowering to prevent it seeding around every where.  Other than that, it is a well loved and useful alpine plant.  Available most garden centres around now. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 683
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 772
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 359
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 621
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1384
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 999
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5570
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned