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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

bark chip

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:49

Cheaper to get it delivered from an on line store, depending very much on how much you need - and the bags it comes in make wonderful raised beds afterwards.

bluebells

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:47

One of the main problems will not be growing the bluebells, given enough encouragemnt you can probaby do that - but they are a very poor cut flower, and will droop almost within minutes, making them rather unsuitable for a wedding bouquet.  Could she consider blue scilla?  They respond to cutting quite well, though may be on the short side for the bouquet. 

creating a full bodied hedge

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:45

It's rather a fact with hedges, yes a hair cut will help them bush up, but the fact is that the top of the shrub overshadows the base so they don't get as much air and light and water.  Trimming, watering well, and feeding will help alot.  Some hedging plants are more prone to bare legs than others - you can always plant something low in front of them, or put pots of lovely things there in the warmer months, and little bulbs for the spring.  In my experience, and I am sure others have more, laurels do tend to bare bases more than some others, at least from what I see around my neighbourhood. 

Do you think...

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:41

Yes, they will grow on, but as with all trees, they will take time.  You cannot pack and send mature trees by post, though there ae companies that specilise in this at a cost.  Your saplings look healthy enough, plant them, feed and water them, and then let nature do the rest - she will, as long as you give her time and supplies to do so. 

Our apple trees looked like that many years  ago when they came, and fruited regularly and well ever since - enjoy. 

Problem Swallow nests

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:39

Not really, they will try to get back to their original nests until they are gone - presumably the work on the offices will eventually mean the old nests are destroyed?  Maybe then they will rebuild elsewhere - lets hope so. 

Egg identification - any ideas?

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:36

To be fair, we probably all worried about these 'eggs' at the beginning of our gardening lives, and new gardeners cannot be expected to know what it is.  We had people to answer us, so let us be decent and explain to the newer generation.  Of course the same things will come up year on year, that's the nature of what we do. Thank goodness there are new gardeners coming along to ask the old questions, and thank goodness there are we old fogeys around to anser them - long may it last.

Amy-new-at-this, thank you not only for asking the question, but for sending decent clear pictures of what it was you wanted identified, that makes it all so much easier, from eggs to leaves. Continue to garden and to love it, there is nothing better on this green earth that trying to keep it that way. 

Talkback: Holes in leaves

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 17:12
Be thankful it is only holes in leaves - some of my family live in Texas, where they had hail the size to fill the palm of a hand - they sent photos - cars multiply deeply dented, windows broken and I guess various animals with headaches!!

Talkback: Hostas and slugs

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 17:10
Funnily enough, my slugs seemed to love the garlic!! I use copper tape on pots, remove the top inch or so of soil with the eggs in and replace with fresh plus new gravel each spring. Robin loves this as he comes to eat the eggs. Have around 65 hostas in pots, never done any in the ground as the slugs run hourly parades around the garden to see what has come up to eat. Did use nematodes one year, they worked - very, very hard work to apply - then of course, as nature abhors a vacuum, in came all the neighbouring slugs. Copper works, eggshells don't, nor does vaseline on pots etc., etc., not here anyway.

A weed or something nice?

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 17:03

Adore this little blue anemone, it does spread around, delightfully - disppears compleletely when it has done it's thing, I allow it everywhere - up to you whether you do or not of course, but I think it is a joy and a delight. 

seedlings

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 17:01

Damp and warmth probably - seeds and seedlings need to be barely moist, not wet, and heat often just cooks them - nice for a woolley mould.  Sow some more in case these don't do. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 618
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 702
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 312
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 560
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1269
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 857
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 22    Views: 4537
Last Post: 18/04/2014 at 14:51
7 threads returned