Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Bumble Bees

Posted: 19/05/2014 at 12:20

What lovely neighbours - and like all good neighbours, if you are nice to them they will be nice to you.  When it is very dry it can be a great kindness to bumbles to leave a shallow bowl of water near their home, as they can get very thirsty.  It is quite fascinating to see them around an old plant saucer with a few stones in it for settling places, all having a welcome drink - of course you never have a camera at hand when these rare things occur.  Maybe they are not rare things?  I'd certainly not seen it before. 

Is this Arum Lily?

Posted: 19/05/2014 at 12:17

It is indeed a very good year for these for some reason, they grow under my large red sycamore where they are welcome, but I don't want them leaking out elsewhere.  Last year the red berries were spectacular - maybe they have just got mature enough to do well. 

Don't Panic.

Posted: 19/05/2014 at 12:14

I have to hang my head in deep shame - I, or rather the garden, have been chemical free for many, many years - then came lily beetle!  Now, I how a large number of lilies, the vast majority in pots, and this year they have already been devastated by the red monsters.  We go out twice a day and kill all we can, but we were losing the battle.  I confess I went and bought a bottle of bug killer, I almost wore a hoody with the front pulled over my face in case anyone recognised me.  I waited till 8.30 pm, hoping the bees etc. would be in bed - then I sprayed the lilies in pots - only the lily pots.  I feel bad because I actually do not like chemicals, but I do love my lilies, and as this beast is an inadvertent import, nothing here will eat it.  What else to do?  

Which Greenhouse heater????

Posted: 15/05/2014 at 19:02

I keep quite alot of fairly tender things overwinter in my cool greenhouse - and electric heater with 'frost' setting does the trick, and costs very little to run.

Paraffin is fine but generates as much water as it uses use fuel, i.e a gallon of paraffin makes a gallon of water to condense all over the plants, windows etc., which is why I stopped using that.  Tea lights and terra cotta are fine if you are prepared to go to the greenhouse 2 or 3 times a day every day - the one night you miss will be the hard frost that bites things.

 

Money saving and recycling tips

Posted: 15/05/2014 at 18:58

Nearly all my growing containers had a previous life as either food containers or cleaning containers - where I used to work (now happily retired - hooray!), salads would come in deep lidded containers - great for propagators - they fitted my heated trays too which was a bonus.  

Still, if you buy plug plants or anything like that they all come in plastic something, and what to do with them does become a problem - I do put them into recycling when I can't use them, in the hope they re-appear as something. 

Hydrangea Leaves Turning Brown/Purple

Posted: 15/05/2014 at 18:55

Probably you have had a few chilly nights - many plants get red or purple leaves when they get cold.  It shouldn't come to any permanent harm if that is what it is.  New growth when it gets warmer will be the right colour.  The plant looks healthy enough - if it were you and me then some throat lozenges would work, but probably not for a hydrangea - coff, cofff……….

Can I grow beetroot in a container

Posted: 15/05/2014 at 18:47

 It needs to be pretty deep as there needs to be room not just for the beet itself but for the roots underneath.  Beets don't much like being transplanted, but it can be done with care and plenty of water,  Use a sandy  compost, or with plenty of vermiculite so the beets can push down into it.  Best of luck with them. 

What are these little blue flowers?

Posted: 14/05/2014 at 18:04

Interestingly our local nursery who sell many basket plants is selling this as a useful basket plant. Also they are selling the red leafed yellow flowered oxalis that I spend hours trying to get rid of in my greenhouse - are there no rules about what can be sold as a valued plant? 

Perrienrals

Posted: 08/05/2014 at 11:29

It also depends how big and mature they are when you get them.  If little and from small pots, then you are 100% right, including the second potting on.  However, some companies sell large, mature plants in 2 - 3 litre pots, or that size from bare root digging up,  with mature prices to go with them,  and while these may need hardening off and getting used to the weather, wind etc. of your garden, may well be big enough to plant out at once.  Play it by ear (or trowel if you prefer!)  Enjoy anyway. 

Perrienrals

Posted: 08/05/2014 at 11:28

It also depends how big and mature they are when you get them.  If little and in small pots, then you are 100% right, including the second potting on.  However, some companies sell large, mature plants in 2 - 3 litre pots, with mature prices to go with them,  and while these may need hardening off and getting used to the weather, wind etc. of your garden, may well be big enough to plant out at once.  Play it by ear (or trowel if you prefer!)  Enjoy anyway. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 668
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 758
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 350
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 608
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1352
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 962
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5423
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned