Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

creating a full bodied hedge

Posted: 08/05/2013 at 09:52

... to say nothing of the perfume of the white narcissi, the red peeled back buds of the acers against their acid green and deep purple young leaves, the bright pink oxalis, blue scillas, and loads of birds on the feeders - why woudn't everyone garden I wonder? 

Do you think...

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 16:43

Yes, I too would be more concerned about the larvae than the smallness of the saplings - can you as Klink suggests, take a picture of those?  If you have disposed of them, then look up vine weavil larvae on a search engine and see if that is what they looked like??  If so, your supplier can take your plants away and give you new ones with no additions!!  They may be something quite harmless, but you need to make sure. 

creating a full bodied hedge

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 15:19

ah Catnip, we're all liable to feel like that from time to time, about 10 times a day in my case, when I look out at the garden and see all the things I want to do and the few hours there are to do them in!!  It is such a lovely surprise when people like the garden, even when sometimes all the gardener sees are what they percieve is not right - we should take the advice of one famous gardener on TV, who said 'don't forget just to stop and give the garden a good looking at and dose of enjoyment' - no-one else will worry about the laurels bare legs, and given time you will improve it. 

clematis suggestion please

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:52

So is the pale pink Hagley hybrid, most of the paler ones appreciate some shade, also the alpina types do well in the kind of place you describe. 

bark chip

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:49

Cheaper to get it delivered from an on line store, depending very much on how much you need - and the bags it comes in make wonderful raised beds afterwards.

bluebells

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:47

One of the main problems will not be growing the bluebells, given enough encouragemnt you can probaby do that - but they are a very poor cut flower, and will droop almost within minutes, making them rather unsuitable for a wedding bouquet.  Could she consider blue scilla?  They respond to cutting quite well, though may be on the short side for the bouquet. 

creating a full bodied hedge

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:45

It's rather a fact with hedges, yes a hair cut will help them bush up, but the fact is that the top of the shrub overshadows the base so they don't get as much air and light and water.  Trimming, watering well, and feeding will help alot.  Some hedging plants are more prone to bare legs than others - you can always plant something low in front of them, or put pots of lovely things there in the warmer months, and little bulbs for the spring.  In my experience, and I am sure others have more, laurels do tend to bare bases more than some others, at least from what I see around my neighbourhood. 

Do you think...

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:41

Yes, they will grow on, but as with all trees, they will take time.  You cannot pack and send mature trees by post, though there ae companies that specilise in this at a cost.  Your saplings look healthy enough, plant them, feed and water them, and then let nature do the rest - she will, as long as you give her time and supplies to do so. 

Our apple trees looked like that many years  ago when they came, and fruited regularly and well ever since - enjoy. 

Problem Swallow nests

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:39

Not really, they will try to get back to their original nests until they are gone - presumably the work on the offices will eventually mean the old nests are destroyed?  Maybe then they will rebuild elsewhere - lets hope so. 

Egg identification - any ideas?

Posted: 07/05/2013 at 11:36

To be fair, we probably all worried about these 'eggs' at the beginning of our gardening lives, and new gardeners cannot be expected to know what it is.  We had people to answer us, so let us be decent and explain to the newer generation.  Of course the same things will come up year on year, that's the nature of what we do. Thank goodness there are new gardeners coming along to ask the old questions, and thank goodness there are we old fogeys around to anser them - long may it last.

Amy-new-at-this, thank you not only for asking the question, but for sending decent clear pictures of what it was you wanted identified, that makes it all so much easier, from eggs to leaves. Continue to garden and to love it, there is nothing better on this green earth that trying to keep it that way. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

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7 threads returned