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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

problems with bamboo

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 16:33

They are quite close together too and look a bit dry?  Bamboo likes water, and space, depending upon the type.  Indeed they are preparing to put out new leaves, give them time, they should recover. 

Pruning a Privet hedge

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 16:32

It may also be less full on your side if the sun comes at a different angle from that of  your neighbour.  Indeed, prune hard later on when nesting is over, feed, feed and then water, water and then leave alone for a year or so - if it can recover, it will.   A year of lack of attention won't do a decent privet much harm at all - if it looks tatty now, it has suffered longer than that - but can be imporved. 

My neighbour has a lovely red rose that fills our side of the fence with lovely flowers, but not his, mine faces south, his, therefore,  north - so of course I get the flowers.  We have installed a fence with spaces between the lathes, this has improved matters no end for him, besides breaking up the wind instead of just causing it to swirl round damagaing everything.  

Is 12 inches a deep enough hole for a clematis?

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 16:26

I think it is pushing it a bit, but both of those are fairly small so may well be OK.  Give them plenty of shade at thr roots and plenty of organic material to toot into.  Don't forget they are greedy plants and need plenty of feeding.  Don't forget Allonushka does not get very tall, so might struggle covering alot of space, but of course you may not have alot of space to cover.  Both lovely, enjoy. 

problem daffodils?

Posted: 30/04/2013 at 16:23

It could be a virus, it could also be cold damage.  Some of mine came up looking like a concertina, as if they had to struggle out of the ground - definitly cold damage - maybe this is too?  I know of tulip virus but have not come across one that attacks daffodils as well, tho' I guess that is possible.  Grow many different kinds here, some have stripey leaves like that, and seem to be fine - someone else may know more.  

Today I feel so happy....

Posted: 23/04/2013 at 11:45

Fairygirl, I bought some acrylic mirror type tiles in Ikea for a very small price, they ae slightly faceted so the birds avoid them (no, I don't understand it, but it is so) and they give wonderful broken light effect patches where it is normally dark.  Come t think of it, I must get them out of the shed and hang them up - I put them away when it is very cold as I suspect that they are not very hardy, just a coating of silver paint on plastic, but they are great draped in various growth !!  

Dragon claw willow

Posted: 23/04/2013 at 10:34

Now - 32 is not something with which I wish to become aquainted!!  Plus 32 now that is a different matter!!  Gardening where you are must be quite a challenge, but of course we gardeners are always up fpr a challenge.  Last year here it was all about low light conditions, persistent rain and general yuckiness. Today it is bright and pretty but with a gentle gale blowing - I say gentle because although the wind in strong, so far no branches have fallen on to the grass that I would like to claim is a lawn, but I'd get sued under the trade descriptions act if I did.   This means I shall have to go out later on and pick the daffodils/narcissi that have been blown over.  I rarely pick flowers from the garden, but blown over daffs I always do - they're not going to get better, so we may s well enjoy them indoors for a few days.

happy gardening this year, as with all years we haven't had yet, this will be a brilliant one ! 

Dragon claw willow

Posted: 22/04/2013 at 20:04

Oh dear, it was indeed rare in those times to get such low temperatures, but in the winter of 2010 - 11 we had -17 in our garden. To my surprise nearlyeverything survived , probaly because they had a good layer of snow upon them which might have orotected them?  There were of course some losses.  This year I woud think -10 was our lowest, and not for long.   

 

council recycled compost

Posted: 22/04/2013 at 18:07

You are right, but there is a seed sowing one as well as 1, 2, and 3 - I have used that with some sucess the last coule of seasons. 

Dragon claw willow

Posted: 22/04/2013 at 18:06

Guess you don't quite live on my doorstep in the East Midlands obelixx, but even so I agree about not giving up early, June does often see some late and unexpected growth - but not last year when it had all drowned or gone lanky from lack of light - better things this year huh? 

Beginner failing miserably.

Posted: 22/04/2013 at 18:04

Mixing the seed with fine silver sand, to sort of dilute it, seems to work for many people.  Pouring a tiny pinch into the palm of your hand, then with a slightly damp finger tip pick up a few tiny seeds and dot them around the tray - I do this and it does help - at least you get little islands of seedlings and can prick out the outer ones, which will be larger,  and leave the rest to grow on.   You may not sow quite as many hundreds of things that you only want 20 of in this way!

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 687
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 775
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 362
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 623
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1386
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 1001
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5582
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned