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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

fiskas

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 14:16

Hmm, I'd never thought of using one of those, but that sounds effective - might give it a try, thank you both. 

Melted marshmallow in my soil??!!

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 14:14

I am just wondering, if this is not a man made thing, if you have nice (?) big patches of snails eggs?  If you leave them upon the soil, robin or someone like that will love you dearly and dispose of the stuff very quickly!  I suppose there are types of slime mold that can look like that, but I am tempted in the way of well soaked and forgotten polystyrene bits as well. 

Butterflies

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 14:08

I'm afraid I don't know what we saw yesterday, but there were two or three different kinds - they move faster than either my eyes or my brain these days!!

Info For Newbies - How to ensure that your question appears!

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 14:05

...  where's the cake? I did think of making some, but if someone else is doing it I'll join in - made bread yesterday too - nearly time to eat radishes with fresh bread - oh yummy!!

Crown Imperials

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 13:59

They probably will flower yet, the little frits are just getting going this late Spring, and Imperials are usually after those.  The smell is one of those love/hate things that divide gardeners, but the flowers are gorgeous  - maybe move them further from your nose to where you can admire their beauty without the nasal affront? 

As for taking 2 years to flower, last year was so dark and wet, that I imagine they thought better of it - wouldn't you have done?  Sometimes things just do this to surprise us and keep us on our toes.  I had a clematis that didn't flower for 7 years, I left it in as it was a fern leafed one and covered the area of fence anyway, flowers or not - then 3 years ago it started to flower and has done so ever since! 

Stones everywhere

Posted: 21/04/2013 at 13:55

No, please don't, or you will have a good hard set of concrete like soil you cannot do anything with!!  Do remove the largest from the top, (and keep them for drainage at the bottom of any pots you might devide to use)  and then ignore - even if you did remove the ones you can see, there is an everlasting fountain of stones in the middle of the earth theat sends them up all the time - or, more likely, worms, and all sorts of other beasties with whom we share our gardens.   You do need some stones for drainage, and provided they are not so large that the mower will not go over them when you lawn has rooted, then ignore all but the largest.   If you want to grow carrots or other root veggies you would like to have straight roots rather than winding around a stone, use deep containers, these you can keep stone free.

If yu take a drive through certain parts of the Fenlands you will see that nearly all fields there (and probably other parts too, but these are the ones I know), have a good crop of stones, and produce much of the food we use locally.  

Fruit in pots

Posted: 20/04/2013 at 11:50

Mine not quite ready for picking, but soon - indeed, pies and crumbles to warm the cockles in the evening, before the morning gardening! Yum.  Anyone tried rhubarb jam? Does it set or need apple or something to get it to do so?

The price of compost

Posted: 20/04/2013 at 11:48

So much depends on what type of compost you are buying.  Some of them have been dreadful in recent years, and even if given away free would not have been worth the cost of going to collect it!!   I  intended to buy just one bag to test the quality this year before buying lots, but my dear OH could not resist the bargain the ones bught looked to be!  If they are OK then all well and good, peat free and organic, but experience tells that sometimes these are of poor quality.   Like everything else in life, you get - often  -  what you pay for.  Do hope you are lucky and have good stuff for your plants. 

should it be in leaf yet?

Posted: 20/04/2013 at 11:45

Besides, although Helcatt is right (wonderful name!), would you have wanted to come through earlier this year?  Give them time and patience, if they have survived they will show soon. 

germanation

Posted: 20/04/2013 at 11:44

So much depends upon what you sowed, in what, what size seeds, whether the weather has been light or dull - that can really be a 'how long is a eice of string' question.  Germination takes as long as it does!  Some primulas can take up to 2 years, some annuals 3 days, wait - if the seeds were viable they will germinate in their own sweet time, if they are slightly warm (too much warmth stops them), dampened (not wet), & there is light - nature will get on with her job when she feels like it.  Enjoy when they do come through.   Not to depress you, but sometimes you do get seeds that just don't, I find sweet peas can be funny - sow 4  types, 3 come and the 4th not - there's no accounting for it - that's the joy of gardening!

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 683
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 772
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 359
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 621
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1384
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 999
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5570
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned