London (change)
Today 15°C / 9°C
Tomorrow 17°C / 12°C

Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

How do I trim my Carex Frosted Curls?

Posted: 14/05/2013 at 17:12

What a lovely descrition of the carex -  indeedit looks very odd, odder than it shoud, if you trim the ends.  comb it out as Jess says, it will be fine. 

Ground elder

Posted: 14/05/2013 at 17:10

I think so too HJ, in the situation you have it, it must think it is in heaven.  If you have a dull dark corner where nothing grows, move it there - otherwise get rid of it!! I love it where it is, but would never give it a prime place such as yours has.  I think it a pity that growers of such plants don't put proper information on the labels, for this one, mile a minute plant and a few others I know about.

Ground elder

Posted: 13/05/2013 at 23:03

Actually I bought three plants of this 12 years ago, it lives quietly and safely under my red sycamore where absolutely nothing had grown ever.  As long as I never let it flower, watch out that it does not leak out into any nearby pot, it has been quiet and well behaved.  It lights up a dark corner which would otherwise be always dark and dull.  It disappears each winter, I grow spring tiny bulbs there with epidmediums along the open side, it never tries to overgrow those,.  As with any ground cover plant, ensure that it has to struggle to survive and it will behave - it has no choice.  I don't pretend this is a suitable plant for very many places, it could esasily get away in better growing circumstances, but it is not getting better circumstances so it stays put. 

Young Silver birch still dormant?

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 22:15

Good Lee, lets hope they will sprout yet - if we get a bit of sunshine, you never know, 

Ground elder

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 19:42

The very nature of a stron ground cover means that it will be invasive, you can't expect a plant just to stop where you would like it to, when its nature is to spread all over!!  I'd still rather have ground elder than mares tail or docks!!  If it gets into the laawn (not hapened here yet, but I know it has to quite a few folk) it responds well to mowing.  Nothing, not even ground elder, likes having its head cut off on a regular basis. 

Leaving tulips in the ground

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 19:40

I do agree with that re the fact that tulip bulbs divide, but have never found that even planting them up to 15 inches deep has made any difference here.  I think that maybe the hybrids are just not strong enough to reflower, unlike the species.  After all, those wonderful colours and shapes were all bred by people from the 2 or 3 original species, so maybe not too surprising they are not so long lived?

Ground elder

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 16:53

If you ever get stiff and sore from digging out ground elder, there is one thing to consider - it was called Bishops Wort because it helped with the pain of gout, which only Bishops got because only they could eat well enough to get it!!   Seriously, you can make a tea with the young leaves, steep a cup full in a larger cupful of boiling water, sweeten with a little Honey and it does help the aches and pains.  It also makes you feel a sense of  'see, you're not winning it all!". It tasted a bit like cabbage water, not totally disgusting, is harmles (unless you are allergic to cabbage and its family), and truly is useful.

One other bit of advice, never, ever let it flower,  also you'll never get rid of it all, taller other plants can and will grow around it, there are worse things to have in the garden, and it does disappear in winter!!

Whats going wrong!?

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 16:47

Indeed, far too cold for such tender things as passion fruit plants.  Ideally you want them in a pot where they can come back into a cool greenhouse or at least a sheltered position come autumn - they are very tender, even the hardier types. I don't know why passion fruits would need citrus fertiliser, I have always used seaweed based fertilizer and it worked, well, but others may know more about that. 

Clillies

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 16:44

I agree, slugs are the most obvious and probable culprit here - the weather had been damp encouring their numbers and you've got young seedling - sometimes 2+2 really does = 4!!

Try the iron based safer slug pellets if you can, copper collars on pots work well - if you are able to handle them then beer traps etc. work well.

Compost heap

Posted: 12/05/2013 at 16:40

There will soon be shrubby prunings when the flowering shrubs are done, I keep many dry leaves and instead of using them to make leaf mold I add them to the compost heap around now.  Shredded paper is good, torn up and crushed carboard good with your lawn cuttings, and weeds whch are not dreadful things like dock or ground elder.  Egg shells, crushed, are good, all yur vegetable peelings etc. of course, the garden will rovide plenty in due course, just keep lightening the load for now, with the card and shreded newpaper. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

watch out, watch out ……..

…… lily beetle about 
Replies: 2    Views: 159
Last Post: 23/04/2015 at 15:38

Odd corrections?

Use of the English language! 
Replies: 18    Views: 434
Last Post: 20/02/2015 at 16:37

Happy seasons greetings to all

Be joyful 
Replies: 14    Views: 517
Last Post: 25/12/2014 at 17:25

squirrels and their cleverness

the unending bane of my life 
Replies: 33    Views: 1259
Last Post: 11/11/2014 at 20:49

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 885
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 954
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 493
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 776
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1602
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 1261
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 10297
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
11 threads returned