Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

last night's Gardeners' World

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:37

Dahlias went out of 'fashion' a few years ago for some reason, why I do not know, they are wonderful garden plants and good in pots too.  I left mine in the ground till the dreadful winter of a couple of years ago when we nearly all lost the lot - once they are frost blackened, lift them, dry them off, keep in a box of slightly damp sand until the spring, when you can start them off early and take cuttings, getting lots of new plants for free - now that's always a good thing huh? 

pot grown tree

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:34

There are so many to chose from, the reality is that you can grow anything in a pot as long as you are willing to do for it all the things it cannot do for itself when in the ground.  Provided you are haooy to do that, then the world is your oyster  - as it were! Do you want evergreen?  If you don't mind the smell, privet makes a wonderful pot plant, the bees and butterflies love the flowers,  when grown as a hedge it gets cut and doesn't often flower.  Get a nice tree book from the library and look at that, I would not recommend growing a tree that wants to be 100 foot tall in a pot (though I do have an oak tree that is 12 foot high in a pot, but I'd not do it again),  look for trees that are naturally small, don't need alot of work and will give you the shape you want.  Things like willow will grow fine but you will be for ever pruning it, the new smaller buddleas might be nice and smell sweet - mallows are good - the list is nearly endless. 

Talkback: Daddy longlegs

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:28

Uuuuuggggghhhhhhhh too

hellp me identify this plant

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:27

Large flamethrower at the ready!! No, not really, but as everyine else says, get rid now. 

poppies

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:26

I'm gradually taking my little brown money envelopes around the garden and gathering seeds, poppies especially, had some really lovely pink ones this year. which I'd like to see again, of course they may not flower true, but they will flower.  I shall keep the envelopes in a tin in the shed (mice!), and sow them where I want them next year - that's really all there should be to it. 

Crab Apple Tree.

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:24

Agree re root stock.  If it was a grafted tree, and most of them are - then track the new shoots down to the base and remove them as far below the soil as you can.  Keep an eye on the base & remove any suckers you see coming out from there in the future.  If it was not a grafted tree, then I am at a loss .........

Uploading pictures

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:21

Look forward to seeing the pictures now huh?

Bay tree help

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:20

I wonder if one is sitting in a colder windier place than its brother?  Our golden one outside the back door got like this, I cut it back to ground level preparatory to removing it, and it shot up with new stems and has - so far - been great since.  maybe a hard prune might help yours too?  

Can anyone identify these caterpillars?

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:18

Don't know about the caterpillars, but I would prune the plants back past where the worst of the damage is, feed them (still just about time) or give an ericaceous fertilser drink and they will probably get over it for flowering time next year.  

Getting aerial ivy roots off brick

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:17

If it freezes hard this winter they may well dry and come off, but the reality is that the fine thready roots are inside the top layer of the bricks, and if you scrub or scrape hard enough to get them off you will probably damage the brick work - a greater problem I should imagine.   I'd be very anxious about using a pressure washer, even on a lower setting, as the mortar between the bricks might start to come away - does not sound ideal to me.  Probably you are stuck with it for now, over time they will deteriorate and come off - meantime, just learn to live with it and eventually you will stop noticing it. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
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For whom do we garden .............

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frosted lilies

any advice? 
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out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
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bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
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Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned