Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Climbing rose

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:13

I do agree re leaving the pruning till spring, I do that too.  Some of those tall strands may well be suckers as Stephen says, those I would remove now, as they can become very hard and extremely prickly.  Also you want the plant to put its energy into growing new shoots for roses next year, not suckers which will never do anything for you. 

cats

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:10

There is a plant that is sold as being fisliked by cats, I think it is a coleus family member.  Lots and lots of white pepper helps, they don't like sneezing when they wee, and plastic rug holders, and wide thick plastic mesh just under the soil make it difficult for them to dig there.  It is a cats nature to do this, so making it as unpleasant an experiene as possible should help.  Some people swear by the apparatus that squirts water at the cat when it crosses the sensor, which is fine as long as it is only cats that set it off - small children and welcome dogs are unlikely to appreciate it.   When you plant bulbs put cuttings of holly, berberis or pyracantha sticks pushed into the ground, very prickly and they won't like that - you can easily remove them later when the bulbs are up.   Whatever you do about it, please do not hurt the cats as that is illegal and I'm sure you don't want to go there.   i have gardened in the company of cats for many years, and they can go together,f with a bit of thought on your part.  Once your planting gets thick they will go away, becasue there will be nowhere to dig.  

bird feeders

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:05

I have, for many years, made fat balls for the many little birds which come to our garden.  This was great, until the squirrels and magpies found them, and then it became impossible, because a) they ate them all in ten minutes and b) the little birds were too aftraid to come near.  I bought a peanut feeder with a very wide mesh cage around it, the small birds are supposed to go into it to eat, the bigger creatures  are not supposed to be able to get in.  However, it has hung in the same place as the original feeder for 4 months, and the small birds sit around looking at it, but none will go in to feed!!  The metal mixed seeds feeder gets emptied much as ever - with a little help from the squirrels, but on the whole that is OK.  How on earth can I get the little birds to go inside the cage and use the fat balls?  Anyone any bright ideas about it - thanks. 

Hops

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 12:46

PS Your willow screen fence might grow as well!

Hops

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 12:45

Also do be aware that 8 feet high will not contain them, my yellow leafed one regularly reaches the upper storey of the house every year - and is laden with flowers just now.  It dies down completely in the winter, removing the old stems is not difficult, then regrows the whole lot again come Spring.  It does spread out from the original root site,  I cut the stems I don't want as low into the ground as possible, but it is still gentlly spreading - now about 3 foot across and probably 20 foot high - it's gorgeous and the bees etc. love it oo. 

Talkback: Speedwell

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 12:42

There are several very good, 'tame' speedwells, which willnot take over your garden.   What does the label say?  If it is 'Georgia Blue' that is a real early spring gem, formng nice low hummocks of blue flowers with reddish stems and leaves when there is little else in the garden.   While it is not unknown for people to sell ferocious plants, such as Russian Vine, sold as fallopia - it is not as common as we might think.  If you are really worried about it, plant it in a pot for this winter and see what it does.

Talkback: Bats

Posted: 31/08/2012 at 18:00

Actually it's not that innoffensive - we had huge numbers of large bats in the roof of our house in Zambia, and their  droppings were anything but innoffensive!!  However, I guess that particular species, and the sheer numbers, are not likly to occur here! 

Talkback: Bats

Posted: 30/08/2012 at 19:17

There aes ome old buildings near us and we often see bats in the evenings.  I have put out bat boxes in the hope they might like to live with us, but so far they are - probably wisely - happier where they are.

Deformed beans

Posted: 30/08/2012 at 19:14

Nothing to worry about, as you know they taste normal and that is all that matters.  A touch of cold to make them grow quicker on one side than the other, a tiny knoock or bit in their extreme youth and this happens - the supermarkets make the growers throw these out as the little ignorant darlings, kept that way by the companies,  who buy them might not like the look of them - I won't say the words I think about that, this is an open site!!

Hydrangea Macrophylla.

Posted: 30/08/2012 at 19:10

Now you know why it is advised to cut back a third of the old shoots, if you do it all the bush thinks it is in danger and responds by sending up as many shoots as it possibly can - in the hope it can flower and set seed to survive.

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 654
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 744
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 342
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 599
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1329
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 945
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5307
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned