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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

poppies

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:26

I'm gradually taking my little brown money envelopes around the garden and gathering seeds, poppies especially, had some really lovely pink ones this year. which I'd like to see again, of course they may not flower true, but they will flower.  I shall keep the envelopes in a tin in the shed (mice!), and sow them where I want them next year - that's really all there should be to it. 

Crab Apple Tree.

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:24

Agree re root stock.  If it was a grafted tree, and most of them are - then track the new shoots down to the base and remove them as far below the soil as you can.  Keep an eye on the base & remove any suckers you see coming out from there in the future.  If it was not a grafted tree, then I am at a loss .........

Uploading pictures

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:21

Look forward to seeing the pictures now huh?

Bay tree help

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:20

I wonder if one is sitting in a colder windier place than its brother?  Our golden one outside the back door got like this, I cut it back to ground level preparatory to removing it, and it shot up with new stems and has - so far - been great since.  maybe a hard prune might help yours too?  

Can anyone identify these caterpillars?

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:18

Don't know about the caterpillars, but I would prune the plants back past where the worst of the damage is, feed them (still just about time) or give an ericaceous fertilser drink and they will probably get over it for flowering time next year.  

Getting aerial ivy roots off brick

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:17

If it freezes hard this winter they may well dry and come off, but the reality is that the fine thready roots are inside the top layer of the bricks, and if you scrub or scrape hard enough to get them off you will probably damage the brick work - a greater problem I should imagine.   I'd be very anxious about using a pressure washer, even on a lower setting, as the mortar between the bricks might start to come away - does not sound ideal to me.  Probably you are stuck with it for now, over time they will deteriorate and come off - meantime, just learn to live with it and eventually you will stop noticing it. 

Climbing rose

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:13

I do agree re leaving the pruning till spring, I do that too.  Some of those tall strands may well be suckers as Stephen says, those I would remove now, as they can become very hard and extremely prickly.  Also you want the plant to put its energy into growing new shoots for roses next year, not suckers which will never do anything for you. 

cats

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:10

There is a plant that is sold as being fisliked by cats, I think it is a coleus family member.  Lots and lots of white pepper helps, they don't like sneezing when they wee, and plastic rug holders, and wide thick plastic mesh just under the soil make it difficult for them to dig there.  It is a cats nature to do this, so making it as unpleasant an experiene as possible should help.  Some people swear by the apparatus that squirts water at the cat when it crosses the sensor, which is fine as long as it is only cats that set it off - small children and welcome dogs are unlikely to appreciate it.   When you plant bulbs put cuttings of holly, berberis or pyracantha sticks pushed into the ground, very prickly and they won't like that - you can easily remove them later when the bulbs are up.   Whatever you do about it, please do not hurt the cats as that is illegal and I'm sure you don't want to go there.   i have gardened in the company of cats for many years, and they can go together,f with a bit of thought on your part.  Once your planting gets thick they will go away, becasue there will be nowhere to dig.  

bird feeders

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 17:05

I have, for many years, made fat balls for the many little birds which come to our garden.  This was great, until the squirrels and magpies found them, and then it became impossible, because a) they ate them all in ten minutes and b) the little birds were too aftraid to come near.  I bought a peanut feeder with a very wide mesh cage around it, the small birds are supposed to go into it to eat, the bigger creatures  are not supposed to be able to get in.  However, it has hung in the same place as the original feeder for 4 months, and the small birds sit around looking at it, but none will go in to feed!!  The metal mixed seeds feeder gets emptied much as ever - with a little help from the squirrels, but on the whole that is OK.  How on earth can I get the little birds to go inside the cage and use the fat balls?  Anyone any bright ideas about it - thanks. 

Hops

Posted: 01/09/2012 at 12:46

PS Your willow screen fence might grow as well!

Discussions started by Bookertoo

squirrels and their cleverness

the unending bane of my life 
Replies: 34    Views: 924
Last Post: 11/11/2014 at 20:49

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 719
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 813
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 387
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 665
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1439
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 1051
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5798
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
8 threads returned