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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Talkback: Cleavers

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:35

Never have we seen so much cleavers, goosegrass, johnny run by the hedge, sticky grass - as many names as there are.  I even found a piece up in the golden hop, about 8 foot high, never had that before.  Ir is certainly a very good year for it.  Also in other countries, my sister in laws garden in the Netherlands is overun with it as well - must like the wet? 

Strawberry Plants and Fruit bushes - weed control

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:32

The weed control membrane is a good idea though, as it will keep the fruits clean - but the slugs crawl across it very easily - there are no really good answers to keeping strawberries completely  untouched that I am aware of, maybe others know more.  Netting and vigourous observation for ripeness and quick removal then seems to work best. 

storing garlic

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:30

You can also chop or mince it and freeze with a litle water in ice cube trays, you might not want oil in all your dishes.  Just throw as many cubes as you want into any dishes needfing garlic - that is, all of them! Well, maybe not jam tarts ..........

Photinia (Red Robin) Trees

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:28

I was interested to read your question as mine are also more sparse than usual, though the leaves that are present are a very good colour.  I'm inclined to blame wet and dry in the wrong seasons, plus dark and cold since April.  i imagine they will recover, mine are abut the same age as yours so, with you, I shall await with interest to see if any experts know of any other reasons why this has happened. 

Grass solutions

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:26

Grass will always regrow once the weather changes - I cannot imagine how much money outdoor lamps and power would cost, but unless you are running a crown bowling green, I would recomment patience as the best medicine. 

rhubarb

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:25

Stop now, many people say you should not pull after June, but most rhubarb was late this year because of the dark wet start to the year.  Stop now, and give the plant the rest of the year to gather strength, mature its roots and dig down for the winter.  It will then shoot up next year for more pies, crumbles, jam etc. yummy!

Golden rule

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:23

It very much depends why you are pruning? Are you wishing to contain a plant that is rather too big for its site? Do you want to encourage flowering and / or fruiting?   Plants in the wild don't get pruned and they survive, so really, unless you go totally wild you can't kill anything with a bit of pruning.  Indeed, to prune after flowering is a good rule, of thumb, knowing whether the plant does whatever you want it to do on new or old wood is a good idea, i cut off my lilac flowers for ages before i realised I was doing it too late - poor thing, i gave it all sorts of abuse because it didn't flower, and it was my fault.  Stick to one set of guidelines, too many books will confuse you and then the plant - they are very forgiving, and want to grow, so any mistakes will correct themselves in due course. 

Geraniums (not Pelargoniums)

Posted: 18/07/2012 at 10:19

The trouble with all the books we read, both old and new, is that the plants have read none of them, and will do exactly as they please when they please, and whenever they please.  Most hardy geraniums benefit from a haircut in autumn, I've also known people to do it now to get young growth before the winter, looks good throughout then unless it gets frozen.  in the end, provided you have not maybe overdone the nurturing and so on, it will just get on with it.  i have many of these all over the garden, they are wonderful plants.  Sometimes, as with many things, less is more, maybe leave it alone for a while? I believe it's only been in place 2 months? It hasn't had any chance to grow good roots to keep it well settled, it will, just give it time. 

Strawberry Plants and Fruit bushes - weed control

Posted: 17/07/2012 at 22:02

Netting is the answer for birds and squirrels, careful siting with little or no access for the slimy ones for the slugs and snails.  My raised bed for strawberries is made of brick, with a good rough surface, the slugs and snails dislike using this to access the fruits, there are easier things for them to attack.  The berries in pots and growbags have copper tape around them to discourage them - and as I said, netting over all - the somewhat stiffer type in which the birds cannot get tangled.  All we need now is some sunshine to give us some berries to protect!!

Lavender from seed

Posted: 17/07/2012 at 21:57

I have not grown lavender from seed on purpose, but it has self seeded in our garden, in the gravel path,  so that sowing must have happened in autumn when the seeds fall. They would then have sat in the gravel over winter and then begun to grow come spring - so I'm not quite sure why the instructions the pack gave were as they are - it's not what nature has done here.  Maybe sowing them into a seed tray and keeping out in the open, sheltered maybe, under a hedge or something,  as you do with some primroses - this may be the answer? 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 610
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 691
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 307
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 552
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1254
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 843
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 22    Views: 4398
Last Post: 18/04/2014 at 14:51
7 threads returned