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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Climbing Ivy

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 20:15

... or even mile or two - might teach me to check before posting - or not!

New home - Blank plot

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 15:15

Leave it well alone for a while, to find out where the sun shines, where the water lies, where the shade is.  Test the soil for its acidity levels, put in a few bulbs to cheer you in the Spring.  Sit down with books, paper, neighbours, library books, the internet and decide over the winter what you really, really want.  Get any hard landscaping you want done in the winter, keep the bulbs weeded and look forward to them. If the area has been gardened before it is even more important to wait a season or two to see what treasures, if any, there are - you don't want to grub out the one plant you have wanted for years and never knew was there.  Addd a few tulip bulbs to the patch you've already done.  You don't have to do it all at once, much more fun and pleasure to be got by doing things slowly by slowly, hopefully you have a long time there to get it as you want it - in time.  Meantime, enjoy the planning, look at gardens in the area and see what they have doing well - still possible at this time of year.  Don't panic, it will still be there next Spring.  Do not rotovate, it spreads weeds over a huge area - lost an allotment like that!!

Fork Handles

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 15:06

Yes, it is £16 pounds to get in now, I assume that's what you eant by 1/6d?

Climbing Ivy

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 15:03

If you grow a cutting from the tips where it is flowering, the resultant plant will not climb - can be useful if you want some leaves but not the whole wall/fence covered for the next milr or tow!

Can I reuse, or should I discard?

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 12:51

However, as you have blight every year, it might be a good idea to start again with clean everything, just in case it is harboured around soomething?  It is a virus, and indeed does die off in the cold, but maybe it is worth investing in new pots, compost & sticks - what harm can it do, and it might just result in a gorgeous crop of tomatoes - who knows? 

Cosmos & Verbara

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 12:49

Chocolate cosmos will overwinter in a pot in a cool grenhouse, but not in the ground or out of doors.  Mine is now 3 years old, and lives in the greenhouse all year - just because I get even stronger chocolate perfume from it in there!!

What will happen to my Cotinus?!

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 12:47

It will survive well, mine gets cut back this month. If very hard you may not get 'smoke' next year, the year I did that I loved it as the colour of the leaves was stunning.  This year it did have smoko, and is now ready for the chop.  There is a good RHS book on pruning,  you might get it from your public library? Takes all the mystique out of it tetty well.

Rosemary

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 12:44

It dpends upon which rosemary's you have.  Most of the tall upright types are very hardy, though if it snows alot you will need to clear it off the branches, several branches broke on my tall one when we had the heavy snow 2 winter ago.  The low weeping or repens type - often called 'capri' is not particularly hardy, I keep it in a cool greenhouse over winter having lost it before.  Possibly it will do with fleece and newspaper, tuck  the pot near the house or uner a hedge.  If in the ground, then peg some horticultural fleece over it when the weather demands. 

Weeping Rose

Posted: 15/10/2012 at 12:41

Horticultural fleece over both the rose and the pot will help - bubble wrap can get very wet inside and if it then feeezes the pot can break, most care is for the pot not the plant as roses in pots do fine whatever the weather throws at them.  If we are going to get the temperatures we did 2 winters ago, then two layers of fleece with newpaper between them should cover most eventualities - it has done so here so far, East Midlands.   I agree with Cristopher2, I keep them on the dry side - just allowing whatever falls from the sky to keep them going.  We never water in winter, this applies to just about all our many pots. 

When do you bring your tender perennials inside?

Posted: 01/10/2012 at 14:06

So muh depends upon the amount of frost we get -  until 2 years ago I left alot of things outside but after that killer winter I bring into the greenhouse alot more than I used to do.  Alliums are fine out there, as are lilies, but blue salvias, chocolate cosmos (not the annuals) need bringing in, as do geraniums, not the scrambers, they stay out and are fine,  but the pelargoniums.  Fuschias, some potted pinks, agapanthus in pots, various other tender things come in when the night temeratures drop enough for a grass frost.  I keep the greenhouse around 5 degrees when it freezes, with an electric heater.  Anything that needs more than that just has to take its chances. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

watch out, watch out ……..

…… lily beetle about 
Replies: 2    Views: 217
Last Post: 23/04/2015 at 15:38

Odd corrections?

Use of the English language! 
Replies: 18    Views: 516
Last Post: 20/02/2015 at 16:37

Happy seasons greetings to all

Be joyful 
Replies: 14    Views: 561
Last Post: 25/12/2014 at 17:25

squirrels and their cleverness

the unending bane of my life 
Replies: 33    Views: 1392
Last Post: 11/11/2014 at 20:49

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 986
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 1013
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 527
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 817
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1681
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 1402
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 44    Views: 15371
Last Post: 28/08/2015 at 20:53
11 threads returned