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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

ID Please

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 10:56

However, this is a really strong thug, it covers miles (literally) of bank near our ex-quarry fields, and there it looks lovely.  Hard to get rid of in the garden if you get fed up with it.  You can grow little spring bulls like iris reticulata through it - that is lovely. 

Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diablo'

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 10:55

Verdun, when do you cut your 'diabolo' hard?  I have one that is several years old, been frozen hard and drowned, but gives the most stunning foliage year after year.  I don't reckon the title pink flowers much, but the leaves ………   I've never really known when or how hard to prune it, just take bits off when the fancy takes me.  

I've got blue cammasia in front of it, followed by bears breeches, with various hardy geraniums and grasses everywhere.  Not much organisation to my gardening really.

Seedaholicism

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 10:51

It's a good thing my neighbours know me well, or the sounds of delight coming from the greenhouse when anything has germinated, might make them call the police!  I have a big jute carrier bag hanging in the back porch, full of packets of seeds - it is my 'go to' when no gardening can get done.  Mentally I sow the whole garden with new things (it is as stuffed as possible already but hey, imagination is free!), and feel much better after a while!!  Can't resist a reduced pile of seed packets, even if I have every carrot , sweet pea, lettuce and sunflower seed known to humankind, and no-where left to put them……………..

Snowflake Variety

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 10:48

That's the best bet, the leaves from this year will give food and strength to the bulbs and they will probably flower beautifully next year.  Once they are settled, they will gently spread - we have some lovely clumps where it would not have occurred to me to put them.  Birds eat the seeds then sit somewhere to digest them, dropping the seeds and then off they go.  Lovely, and totally free - what's not to love?  I don't find that the doubles spread as well as the singles, insects have trouble getting into double flowers to pollinate them, which is why I don't grow double flowers much.  The singles are pollinated and then set viable seed.  I guess you could harvest that and sow it yourself, but I'm lazy and quite happy for the birds to do the work for me. 

Snowflake Variety

Posted: 24/02/2014 at 10:46

That's the best bet, the leaves from this year will give food and strength to the bulbs and they will probably flower beautifully next year.  Once they are settled, they will gently spread -we have some lovely clumps where it would not have occurred to me to put them.  Birds eat the seeds then sit somewhere to digest them, dropping the seeds and then off they go.  Lovely, and totally free - what's not to love?

Growmore

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 14:11

It might seem a pity to use a product made in a factory rather than something nicely rotted on a compost heap?  Of course, not everyone has the space to do that.   We use pelleted organic chicken manure in April, sprinkled all over everywhere and in anything,  and then liquid seaweed based fertiliser for anything else that needs a boost in the year. 

ID Please

Posted: 23/02/2014 at 14:05

Do not be tempted to put this tree into a very big pot to start with.  Plants dislike being over potted - something big enough to take the roots with some compost around them, it will do well.   You could use the root fungus mycorrhiza too to help the roots develop well.

First time hanging baskets

Posted: 21/02/2014 at 10:57

I've done tiny toms in hanging baskets - if you get a long hot summer they are wonderful, just nipping off a few warm sweet and tart toms as you pass the basket- yummmmm.    However, the weather does not always give us this chance, last year for example, it really did not come to much at all.  Let's hope for a real summer at the right time for this year - well, hoping is still free!

Talkback: Growing hellebores

Posted: 21/02/2014 at 10:56

Wow Jimmy, are you going to try seeds from the yellow one?  You may have found something extra special there, but even if it doesn't seed true - which, let's be honest here - is unlikely - what a lovely thing to see.  Could you post a picture of it for us to enjoy - albeit at a distance?

Agree about the washed out mauve colours, but even some of those can be lovely in the right places.  I am hoping my glorious spotted one will seed itself about and come true - but no matter what, the new ones will be welcome. 

Hollyhock queeny

Posted: 20/02/2014 at 16:10

Sadly hollyhock rust is a serious difficulty here, and you rarely see any plant without some - in fact, many people treat them as annuals just for that reason, as the rust in the first season can be less.  There are one or two types of rooted plugs you can buy which say they are rust free - I suppose it depends how bad it is in your soil. 

I stopped growing several different plants because of local problems, the lupin aphid stopped all of that group here, and grey mould on monada - no matter what you do it is  everywhere and just comes back.  I note my beloved tall eryngiums have rust most years, at the bottom of the plant mostly, so grow lots of smaller annuals at their feet to cover much of it.  Where there's a will ………… 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
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Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

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Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
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Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
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Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
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Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

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Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 32    Views: 5140
Last Post: 15/08/2014 at 12:57
7 threads returned