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Bookertoo


Latest posts by Bookertoo

Dead Wisteria

Posted: 28/05/2012 at 10:15

Hear hear, patience is a virtue in apparently dead plants.  My local shop keeps 'dead' plants for me to look at, and sells them to me at ridiculous prices (they think it is ridiculous because they are selling me a dead plant, and I think it ridiculous because I have had good plants for next to nothing!).    E.g. my now large and beautiful corkscrew hazel cost me 49p., ditto several other things.  Seems like a winner either way - and teaches patience.

Talking of which, i have a  'James Stirling'  whipcord hebe, which is about 9 - 10 years old. It is a lovely shade of gold, and has become a pretty big plant.  This year, for the first time, it has covered itself with little white starry flowers!   Who would have thought!

Allium growths?

Posted: 28/05/2012 at 10:09

Yes, the odd one does do this bulb in the flower production - I have never done anything with them except marvel at their interesting looks, maybe if I get some this year I shoud try and plant them?   Could take a very long time before getting anything useful, but that is OK. 

Mowing the lawn, but not the frogs!

Posted: 28/05/2012 at 10:07

I do not have a pond but both our neighbours do and we get lots of little frgs - which is great.  However, on the lines of what Bobthe Gardener said, it is a very disconcerting feeling when you pick up a handful of dead leves and it leas out of your hand!!

BobTheGardener wrote (see)<span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: #465584; font-size: 13px; font-weight: normal;">I have a few toads which are great (they eat slugs!), but they don't half make me jump when they leap out from beneath a shady plant when I'm planting or weeding nearby!


  That did give me a shock the first few times, I try and look a bit closer these days!

Gardeners told 'wash off compost'

Posted: 28/05/2012 at 10:03

Nothing to do with the compost discusion, but if you click on 'go to last unread post' at the left of the thread page, you will get quickly to the end of it.  It does save ages going through the whole thing, unless you want to re-read it all. 

B&Q M.Purpose Compost Issues.

Posted: 24/05/2012 at 19:32

You are entirely correct, I apologise, that will teach me to look properly at the pictures sent - that really makes no sense at all does it?

Glass or no, the compost situation really is very bad this year, it started last year and has gone streadily down hill since - it is hard to get anyone to listen as we don't have much individi=ual pwer, but surely en masse we must be several hundred thousand? Maybe we need a champion, like a decent MP or someone in the public eye, with a petition to get the 'powers that be' to listen?   

B&Q M.Purpose Compost Issues.

Posted: 24/05/2012 at 18:39

I suspect this is a typo, and it should read grass, not glass!! As even decent quality books these days have glaring typos I suppose we cannot expect much from labels like this.

Returning to compost, I have got some B&Q multipurpose with peat, a step backwards as I had not used peat for a few years, but the peat free this year was impossible.  It is not quite a bad so far as some of you have found.  I suppose it varies from batch to batch and maybe where it is made. I never use compost straight from the bag, always mix several things together in a huge plastic tub called 'Mum's mixing pot'.   I add JI seed or 1 for weight, vermiculite for drainage and grit as well.   So far so good.  There have been unacceptably large bits of hard bark, the odd stone, twigs etc., in it, but I suspect that unless you are a commercial gardener that's what is going to happen as these rules have been dumped upon us.  As ever the rules are changed without any discussion as to whether the item will be fit for purpose when used - as if a money counter would care!  They will do when in the future we all stop buying the products.   I will not buy council made compost as I do not  believe they get it hot enough to kill pernicious weeds, and I know that is what I put in my garden bin.  Anything useful goes into our own compost heap. 

Talkback: Apple blossom

Posted: 24/05/2012 at 18:27

I suspect pollinator shortlage too - our eating and crab apples had the best blossom everr this year, but it was cold so there were no pollinators about.   If I were a bee I would have stayed in my hive as well at that time - we will just have to hope there were some hardy things about to do the job.  The crab apple looks particularly sad as the blossom is over, and the usual myriad of tiny weeny apples don't seem to be there. 

Help! Save my Tomatoes!

Posted: 24/05/2012 at 18:24

They do indeed sound rather chlled to me, if there is still signs of life, keep them warm and covered for another few weeks, and try again.  Until the last couple of days it has been too cold for tomatoes outdoors - think about where they evolved>  It doesn't get very cold in Peru!!   You potted them into 3 inch pots after pricking out I guess, what then?  They could be in 6 inch pots now, then in a couple of weeks if they are getting to fill those with roots, you could think about putting into a grow bag, pot or however you want to grow them.  Over potting or putting into a grow bag while they are too small will kill them too, as they cannot use the compost and it gets cold around their baby roots.    Hope they do for you, just be patient. 

New gardener new raised bed

Posted: 21/05/2012 at 20:25

Yes, as long as you remember to open it or take them out if we get the promised warm weather tomorrow - they can cook in a small covered house - no way it gets easy does it - but all so well worth it when you have pretty things to look at, and good fresh things to eat from your own efforts. 

Whats the secret to beautiful hanging baskets ?

Posted: 21/05/2012 at 17:08

Yes, but these are grown in rather forced conditions by professional growers.  I do wonder sometimes if they have access to composts or feeds that we amateurs don't?

The ones you see at garden shows for example, never hang outside as we would want ours to do, they are grown indoors, pampered and touched up every day - most of us cannot do that so it is a weighted competion really.

I think Bev pk's baskets are great, mine would be shredded here if out since January, so I concentrate on summer ones.  I do agree about wicker covered baskets, that the wicker forms part of the display, but you still need plenty of plants to soften them and make them look good. 

Discussions started by Bookertoo

Solomon's seal

Where and how? 
Replies: 14    Views: 616
Last Post: 29/06/2013 at 13:46

For whom do we garden .............

Replies: 12    Views: 701
Last Post: 22/04/2013 at 15:08

frosted lilies

any advice? 
Replies: 0    Views: 310
Last Post: 07/04/2013 at 17:13

out of season plants

why are these wanted? 
Replies: 6    Views: 560
Last Post: 04/03/2013 at 22:43

bird feeders

caged fat ball feeder 
Replies: 19    Views: 1266
Last Post: 01/11/2012 at 08:55

Hazel nut queries

Replies: 2    Views: 855
Last Post: 09/07/2012 at 11:20

Flippin' pigeons

Replies: 22    Views: 4515
Last Post: 18/04/2014 at 14:51
7 threads returned